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      Nontraditional energy-assisted mechanical machining of difficult-to-cut materials and components in aerospace community: a comparative analysis

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      International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing

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          Abstract

          The aerospace community widely uses difficult-to-cut materials, such as titanium alloys, high-temperature alloys, metal/ceramic/polymer matrix composites, hard and brittle materials, and geometrically complex components, such as thin-walled structures, microchannels, and complex surfaces. Mechanical machining is the main material removal process for the vast majority of aerospace components. However, many problems exist, including severe and rapid tool wear, low machining efficiency, and poor surface integrity. Nontraditional energy-assisted mechanical machining is a hybrid process that uses nontraditional energies (vibration, laser, electricity, etc) to improve the machinability of local materials and decrease the burden of mechanical machining. This provides a feasible and promising method to improve the material removal rate and surface quality, reduce process forces, and prolong tool life. However, systematic reviews of this technology are lacking with respect to the current research status and development direction. This paper reviews the recent progress in the nontraditional energy-assisted mechanical machining of difficult-to-cut materials and components in the aerospace community. In addition, this paper focuses on the processing principles, material responses under nontraditional energy, resultant forces and temperatures, material removal mechanisms, and applications of these processes, including vibration-, laser-, electric-, magnetic-, chemical-, advanced coolant-, and hybrid nontraditional energy-assisted mechanical machining. Finally, a comprehensive summary of the principles, advantages, and limitations of each hybrid process is provided, and future perspectives on forward design, device development, and sustainability of nontraditional energy-assisted mechanical machining processes are discussed.

          Highlights

          • A topical review of nontraditional energy-assisted mechanical machining is introduced.

          • The advantages and limitations of each hybrid machining process are addressed.

          • Perspectives on forward design, device development, and sustainability are discussed.

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          Experimental evaluation of the lubrication performance of MoS2/CNT nanofluid for minimal quantity lubrication in Ni-based alloy grinding

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
                Int. J. Extrem. Manuf.
                2631-8644
                2631-7990
                January 29 2024
                April 01 2024
                January 29 2024
                April 01 2024
                : 6
                : 2
                : 022007
                Article
                10.1088/2631-7990/ad16d6
                9f3621f7-fe7a-4096-8545-58687cf042e8
                © 2024

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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