27
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Thymol, thyme, and other plant sources: Health and potential uses : Thymol, health and potential uses

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Thymol is a naturally occurring phenol monoterpene derivative of cymene and isomer of carvacrol. Thymol (10-64%) is one of the major constituent of essential oils of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae), a medicinal plant with several therapeutic properties. This plant, native to Mediterranean regions, is commonly used as a culinary herb and also with a long history of use for different medicinal purposes. Nowadays, thymol and thyme present a wide range of functional possibilities in pharmacy, food, and cosmetic industry. The interest in the formulation of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and cosmeceuticals based on thymol is due to several studies that have evaluated the potential therapeutic uses of this compound for the treatment of disorders affecting the respiratory, nervous, and cardiovascular systems. Moreover, this compound also exhibits antimicrobial, antioxidant, anticarcinogenesis, anti-inflammatory, and antispasmodic activities, as well as a potential as a growth enhancer and immunomodulator. In the present review, these bioactivities have been covered because some of them can contribute to explain the ethnopharmacology of thymol and its main source, T. vulgaris. Other important aspects about thymol are discussed: its toxicity and bioavailability, metabolism, and distribution in animals and humans.

          Related collections

          Most cited references113

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Biological Activities of Essential Oils: From Plant Chemoecology to Traditional Healing Systems

          Essential oils are complex mixtures of hydrocarbons and their oxygenated derivatives arising from two different isoprenoid pathways. Essential oils are produced by glandular trichomes and other secretory structures, specialized secretory tissues mainly diffused onto the surface of plant organs, particularly flowers and leaves, thus exerting a pivotal ecological role in plant. In addition, essential oils have been used, since ancient times, in many different traditional healing systems all over the world, because of their biological activities. Many preclinical studies have documented antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of essential oils in a number of cell and animal models, also elucidating their mechanism of action and pharmacological targets, though the paucity of in human studies limits the potential of essential oils as effective and safe phytotherapeutic agents. More well-designed clinical trials are needed in order to ascertain the real efficacy and safety of these plant products.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found
            Is Open Access

            Influence of two plant extracts on broilers performance, digestibility, and digestive organ size.

            A 42-d trial was conducted to study the influence of 2 plant extracts on performance, digestibility, and digestive organ weights in broilers. The feeding program consisted of a starter diet until 21 d and a finisher diet until 42 d. There were 4 treatment groups: control; 10 ppm avilamycin (AB); 200 ppm essential oil extract (EOE) from oregano, cinnamon, and pepper; and 5,000 ppm Labiatae extract (LE) from sage, thyme, and rosemary. No differences in feed intake or feed conversion were observed. From 14 to 21 d of age, broilers fed the LE diet grew faster than the broilers fed the control or EOE feeds (68.8 vs. 63.9 and 61.6 g/d, respectively). Antibiotic and plant extract supplementation improved apparent whole-tract and ileal digestibility of the nutrients. For starter feed, LE supplementation improved apparent fecal digestibility of DM (P 0.1). At the ileal level, the AB, EOE, and LE supplementation of the starter feed increased DM and starch (P 0.1). All additives improved apparent fecal digestibility of DM and CP of the finisher diet. No differences were observed for proventriculus, gizzard, liver, pancreas, or large or small intestine weight. In the present study, both plant extracts improved the digestibility of the feeds for broilers. The effect of different additives on digestibility improved the performance slightly, but this effect was not statistically significant.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Identification of volatile components in basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and thyme leaves (Thymus vulgaris L.) and their antioxidant properties

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Phytotherapy Research
                Phytotherapy Research
                Wiley
                0951418X
                May 22 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Medical Ethics and Law Research Center; Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences; Tehran Iran
                [2 ]Student Research Committee; Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences; Tehran Iran
                [3 ]Faculty of Pharmaceutical Chemistry; H. N. B. Garhwal University; Srinagar Garhwal 246174 India
                [4 ]Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division; CSIR-National Botanical Research Institute; Lucknow 226001 India
                [5 ]Department of Medical Parasitology; Zabol University of Medical Sciences; Zabol 61663-335 Iran
                [6 ]Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Ambiental y de los Materiales; Universidad de Jaén; Jaén Spain
                [7 ]Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences; University of Granada; Avda. Fuentenueva s/n Granada 18071 Spain
                [8 ]Research and Development Functional Food Centre (CIDAF); Bioregión Building, Health Science Technological Park; Avenida del Conocimiento s /n Granada Spain
                [9 ]Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy; Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences; Tehran Iran
                [10 ]Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Centre, School of Pharmacy; Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences; Tehran Iran
                [11 ]Phytochemistry Research Center; Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences; Tehran Iran
                [12 ]Department of Chemistry, Richardson College for the Environmental Science Complex; The University of Winnipeg; 599 Portage Avenue Winnipeg MB R3B 2G3 Canada
                Article
                10.1002/ptr.6109
                29785774
                9f7b86df-93fe-448b-8319-76b36ab25874
                © 2018

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article