14
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Angiogenic Factors produced by Hypoxic Cells are a leading driver of Anastomoses in Sprouting Angiogenesis–a computational study

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references66

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Endothelial cells dynamically compete for the tip cell position during angiogenic sprouting.

          Sprouting angiogenesis requires the coordinated behaviour of endothelial cells, regulated by Notch and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) signalling. Here, we use computational modelling and genetic mosaic sprouting assays in vitro and in vivo to investigate the regulation and dynamics of endothelial cells during tip cell selection. We find that endothelial cells compete for the tip cell position through relative levels of Vegfr1 and Vegfr2, demonstrating a biological role for differential Vegfr regulation in individual endothelial cells. Differential Vegfr levels affect tip selection only in the presence of a functional Notch system by modulating the expression of the ligand Dll4. Time-lapse microscopy imaging of mosaic sprouts identifies dynamic position shuffling of tip and stalk cells in vitro and in vivo, indicating that the VEGFR-Dll4-Notch signalling circuit is constantly re-evaluated as cells meet new neighbours. The regular exchange of the leading tip cell raises novel implications for the concept of guided angiogenic sprouting.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Angiogenesis in wound healing.

            During wound healing, angiogenic capillary sprouts invade the fibrin/fibronectin-rich wound clot and within a few days organize into a microvascular network throughout the granulation tissue. As collagen accumulates in the granulation tissue to produce scar, the density of blood vessels diminishes. A dynamic interaction occurs among endothelial cells, angiogenic cytokines, such as FGF, VEGF, TGF-beta, angiopoietin, and mast cell tryptase, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment. Specific endothelial cell ECM receptors are critical for these morphogenetic changes in blood vessels during wound repair. In particular, alpha(v)beta3, the integrin receptor for fibrin and fibronectin, appears to be required for wound angiogenesis: alpha(v)beta3 is expressed on the tips of angiogenic capillary sprouts invading the wound clot, and functional inhibitors of alpha(v)beta3 transiently inhibit granulation tissue formation. Recent investigations have shown that the wound ECM can regulate angiogenesis in part by modulating integrin receptor expression. mRNA levels of alpha(v)beta3 in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells either plated on fibronectin or overlaid by fibrin gel were higher than in cells plated on collagen or overlaid by collagen gel. Wound angiogenesis also appears to be regulated by endothelial cell interaction with the specific three-dimensional ECM environment in the wound space. In an in vitro model of human sprout angiogenesis, three-dimensional fibrin gel, simulating early wound clot, but not collagen gel, simulating late granulation tissue, supported capillary sprout formation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate wound angiogenesis, particularly how ECM modulates ECM receptor and angiogenic factor requirements, may provide new approaches for treating chronic wounds.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Inhibition of the Glycolytic Activator PFKFB3 in Endothelium Induces Tumor Vessel Normalization, Impairs Metastasis, and Improves Chemotherapy.

              Abnormal tumor vessels promote metastasis and impair chemotherapy. Hence, tumor vessel normalization (TVN) is emerging as an anti-cancer treatment. Here, we show that tumor endothelial cells (ECs) have a hyper-glycolytic metabolism, shunting intermediates to nucleotide synthesis. EC haplo-deficiency or blockade of the glycolytic activator PFKFB3 did not affect tumor growth, but reduced cancer cell invasion, intravasation, and metastasis by normalizing tumor vessels, which improved vessel maturation and perfusion. Mechanistically, PFKFB3 inhibition tightened the vascular barrier by reducing VE-cadherin endocytosis in ECs, and rendering pericytes more quiescent and adhesive (via upregulation of N-cadherin) through glycolysis reduction; it also lowered the expression of cancer cell adhesion molecules in ECs by decreasing NF-κB signaling. PFKFB3-blockade treatment also improved chemotherapy of primary and metastatic tumors.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Scientific Reports
                Sci Rep
                Springer Nature
                2045-2322
                December 2018
                June 7 2018
                December 2018
                : 8
                : 1
                Article
                10.1038/s41598-018-27034-8
                29311619
                9fe005df-2b8d-4f14-b08f-d74aef3c3800
                © 2018

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article