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      Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections: Asymptomatic Bacteriuria, Uncomplicated & Complicated Urinary Tract Infections, Bacterial Prostatitis

      The Korean Society of Infectious Diseases, The Korean Society for Chemotherapy, Korean Association of Urogenital Tract Infection and Inflammation, The Korean Society of Clinical Microbiology

      Infection and Chemotherapy

      Korean Society of Infectious Diseases and Korean Society for Chemotherapy (KAMJE)

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          The long-term effect of doxazosin, finasteride, and combination therapy on the clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

          Benign prostatic hyperplasia is commonly treated with alpha-adrenergic-receptor antagonists (alpha-blockers) or 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. The long-term effect of these drugs, singly or combined, on the risk of clinical progression is unknown. We conducted a long-term, double-blind trial (mean follow-up, 4.5 years) involving 3047 men to compare the effects of placebo, doxazosin, finasteride, and combination therapy on measures of the clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The risk of overall clinical progression--defined as an increase above base line of at least 4 points in the American Urological Association symptom score, acute urinary retention, urinary incontinence, renal insufficiency, or recurrent urinary tract infection--was significantly reduced by doxazosin (39 percent risk reduction, P<0.001) and finasteride (34 percent risk reduction, P=0.002), as compared with placebo. The reduction in risk associated with combination therapy (66 percent for the comparison with placebo, P<0.001) was significantly greater than that associated with doxazosin (P<0.001) or finasteride (P<0.001) alone. The risks of acute urinary retention and the need for invasive therapy were significantly reduced by combination therapy (P<0.001) and finasteride (P<0.001) but not by doxazosin. Doxazosin (P<0.001), finasteride (P=0.001), and combination therapy (P<0.001) each resulted in significant improvement in symptom scores, with combination therapy being superior to both doxazosin (P=0.006) and finasteride (P<0.001) alone. Long-term combination therapy with doxazosin and finasteride was safe and reduced the risk of overall clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia significantly more than did treatment with either drug alone. Combination therapy and finasteride alone reduced the long-term risk of acute urinary retention and the need for invasive therapy. Copyright 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society
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            Guidelines for antimicrobial treatment of uncomplicated acute bacterial cystitis and acute pyelonephritis in women. Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).

            This is part of the series of practice guidelines commissioned by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) through its Practice Guidelines Committee. The purpose of this guideline is to provide assistance to clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of two specific types of urinary tract infections (UTIs): uncomplicated, acute, symptomatic bacterial cystitis and acute pyelonephritis in women. The guideline does not contain recommendations for asymptomatic bacteriuria, complicated UTIs, Foley catheter-associated infections, UTIs in men or children, or prostatitis. The targeted providers are internists and family practitioners. The targeted groups are immunocompetent women. Criteria are specified for determining whether the inpatient or outpatient setting is appropriate for treatment. Differences from other guidelines written on this topic include use of laboratory criteria for diagnosis and approach to antimicrobial therapy. Panel members represented experts in adult infectious diseases and urology. The guidelines are evidence-based. A standard ranking system is used for the strength of the recommendation and the quality of the evidence cited in the literature reviewed. The document has been subjected to external review by peer reviewers as well as by the Practice Guidelines Committee and was approved by the IDSA Council, the sponsor and supporter of the guideline. The American Urologic Association and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases have endorsed it. An executive summary and tables highlight the major recommendations. Performance measures are described to aid in monitoring compliance with the guideline. The guideline will be listed on the IDSA home page at http://www.idsociety.org It will be evaluated for updating in 2 years.
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              An overview of nosocomial infections, including the role of the microbiology laboratory.

               T. Emori,  R Gaynes (1993)
              An estimated 2 million patients develop nosocomial infections in the United States annually. The increasing number of antimicrobial agent-resistant pathogens and high-risk patients in hospitals are challenges to progress in preventing and controlling these infections. While Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus remain the most common pathogens isolated overall from nosocomial infections, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), organisms previously considered contaminants in most cultures, are now the predominant pathogens in bloodstream infections. The growing number of antimicrobial agent-resistant organisms is troublesome, particularly vancomycin-resistant CoNS and Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to imipenem. The active involvement and cooperation of the microbiology laboratory are important to the infection control program, particularly in surveillance and the use of laboratory services for epidemiologic purposes. Surveillance is used to identify possible infection problems, monitor infection trends, and assess the quality of care in the hospital. It requires high-quality laboratory data that are timely and easily accessible.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Infection and Chemotherapy
                Infect Chemother
                Korean Society of Infectious Diseases and Korean Society for Chemotherapy (KAMJE)
                2093-2340
                2011
                2011
                : 43
                : 1
                : 1
                Article
                10.3947/ic.2011.43.1.1
                © 2011

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