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      Altered parvalbumin-positive neuron distribution in basal ganglia of individuals with Tourette syndrome.

      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

      Adult, Aged, Basal Ganglia, pathology, Caudate Nucleus, Cell Count, Cell Movement, physiology, Globus Pallidus, Humans, Interneurons, chemistry, Middle Aged, Neurons, Parvalbumins, analysis, Tourette Syndrome, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid

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          Abstract

          Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics. Imaging studies found alterations in caudate (Cd) and putamen volumes. To investigate possible alterations in cell populations, postmortem basal ganglia tissue from individuals with TS and normal controls was analyzed by using unbiased stereological techniques. A markedly higher total neuron number was found in the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) of TS. In contrast, a lower neuron number and density was observed in the globus pallidus pars externa and in the Cd. An increased number and proportion of the GPi neurons were positive for the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in tissue from TS subjects, whereas lower densities of parvalbumin-positive interneurons were observed in both the Cd and putamen of TS subjects. This change is consistent with a developmental defect in tangential migration of some GABAergic neurons. The imbalance in striatal and GPi inhibitory neuron distribution suggests that the functional dynamics of cortico-striato-thalamic circuitry are fundamentally altered in severe, persistent TS.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          16131542
          1201574
          10.1073/pnas.0502624102

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