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      Land use/land cover changes and climate: modeling analysis and observational evidence

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          Most cited references 132

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          North American Regional Reanalysis

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            Forests and climate change: forcings, feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests.

             Gordon Bonan (2008)
            The world's forests influence climate through physical, chemical, and biological processes that affect planetary energetics, the hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric composition. These complex and nonlinear forest-atmosphere interactions can dampen or amplify anthropogenic climate change. Tropical, temperate, and boreal reforestation and afforestation attenuate global warming through carbon sequestration. Biogeophysical feedbacks can enhance or diminish this negative climate forcing. Tropical forests mitigate warming through evaporative cooling, but the low albedo of boreal forests is a positive climate forcing. The evaporative effect of temperate forests is unclear. The net climate forcing from these and other processes is not known. Forests are under tremendous pressure from global change. Interdisciplinary science that integrates knowledge of the many interacting climate services of forests with the impacts of global change is necessary to identify and understand as yet unexplored feedbacks in the Earth system and the potential of forests to mitigate climate change.
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              Regions of strong coupling between soil moisture and precipitation.

               Cheng Lu,  ,  Ratko Vasic (2004)
              Previous estimates of land-atmosphere interaction (the impact of soil moisture on precipitation) have been limited by a lack of observational data and by the model dependence of computational estimates. To counter the second limitation, a dozen climate-modeling groups have recently performed the same highly controlled numerical experiment as part of a coordinated comparison project. This allows a multimodel estimation of the regions on Earth where precipitation is affected by soil moisture anomalies during Northern Hemisphere summer. Potential benefits of this estimation may include improved seasonal rainfall forecasts.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change
                WIREs Clim Change
                Wiley-Blackwell
                17577780
                November 2011
                November 2011
                : 2
                : 6
                : 828-850
                10.1002/wcc.144
                © 2011

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/wcc.144

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