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      Advances in using PARP inhibitors to treat cancer

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          Abstract

          The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family of enzymes plays a critical role in the maintenance of DNA integrity as part of the base excision pathway of DNA repair. PARP1 is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, and its expression has been associated with overall prognosis in cancer, especially breast cancer. A series of new therapeutic agents that are potent inhibitors of the PARP1 and PARP2 isoforms have demonstrated important clinical activity in patients with breast or ovarian cancers that are caused by mutations in either the BRCA1 or 2 genes. Results from such studies may define a new therapeutic paradigm, wherein simultaneous loss of the capacity to repair DNA damage may have antitumor activity in itself, as well as enhance the antineoplastic potential of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents.

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          Most cited references 16

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          Oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and recurrent ovarian cancer: a proof-of-concept trial.

          Olaparib is a novel, orally active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor that induces synthetic lethality in homozygous BRCA-deficient cells. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of olaparib for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In this international, multicentre, phase 2 study, we enrolled two sequential cohorts of women (aged >or=18 years) with confirmed genetic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, and recurrent, measurable disease. The study was undertaken in 12 centres in Australia, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the USA. The first cohort (n=33) was given continuous oral olaparib at the maximum tolerated dose of 400 mg twice daily, and the second cohort (n=24) was given continuous oral olaparib at 100 mg twice daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was objective response rate (ORR). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00494442. Patients had been given a median of three (range 1-16) previous chemotherapy regimens. ORR was 11 (33%) of 33 patients (95% CI 20-51) in the cohort assigned to olaparib 400 mg twice daily, and three (13%) of 24 (4-31) in the cohort assigned to 100 mg twice daily. In patients given olaparib 400 mg twice daily, the most frequent causally related adverse events were nausea (grade 1 or 2, 14 [42%]; grade 3 or 4, two [6%]), fatigue (grade 1 or 2, ten [30%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]), and anaemia (grade 1 or two, five [15%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]). The most frequent causally related adverse events in the cohort given 100 mg twice daily were nausea (grade 1 or 2, seven [29%]; grade 3 or 4, two [8%]) and fatigue (grade 1 or 2, nine [38%]; none grade 3 or 4). Findings from this phase 2 study provide positive proof of concept of the efficacy and tolerability of genetically targeted treatment with olaparib in BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer. AstraZeneca. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            Olaparib in patients with recurrent high-grade serous or poorly differentiated ovarian carcinoma or triple-negative breast cancer: a phase 2, multicentre, open-label, non-randomised study.

            Olaparib (AZD2281) is a small-molecule, potent oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. We aimed to assess the safety and tolerability of this drug in patients without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations with advanced triple-negative breast cancer or high-grade serous and/or undifferentiated ovarian cancer. In this phase 2, multicentre, open-label, non-randomised study, women with advanced high-grade serous and/or undifferentiated ovarian carcinoma or triple-negative breast cancer were enrolled and received olaparib 400 mg twice a day. Patients were stratified according to whether they had a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation or not. The primary endpoint was objective response rate by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST). All patients who received treatment were included in the analysis of toxic effects, and patients who had measurable lesions at baseline were included in the primary efficacy analysis. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00679783. 91 patients were enrolled (65 with ovarian cancer and 26 breast cancer) and 90 were treated between July 8, 2008, and Sept 24, 2009. In the ovarian cancer cohorts, 64 patients received treatment. 63 patients had target lesions and therefore were evaluable for objective response as per RECIST. In these patients, confirmed objective responses were seen in seven (41%; 95% CI 22-64) of 17 patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and 11 (24%; 14-38) of 46 without mutations. No confirmed objective responses were reported in patients with breast cancer. The most common adverse events were fatigue (45 [70%] of patients with ovarian cancer, 13 [50%] of patients with breast cancer), nausea (42 [66%] and 16 [62%]), vomiting (25 [39%] and nine [35%]), and decreased appetite (23 [36%] and seven [27%]). Our study suggests that olaparib is a promising treatment for women with ovarian cancer and further assessment of the drug in clinical trials is needed. AstraZeneca. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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              Poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase inhibition: frequent durable responses in BRCA carrier ovarian cancer correlating with platinum-free interval.

              Selective tumor cell cytotoxicity can be achieved through a synthetic lethal strategy using poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor therapy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers in whom tumor cells have defective homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair. Platinum-based chemotherapy responses correlate with HR DNA repair capacity. Olaparib is a potent, oral PARP inhibitor that is well tolerated, with antitumor activity in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Patients with BRCA1/2-mutated ovarian cancer were treated with olaparib within a dose-escalation and single-stage expansion of a phase I trial. Antitumor activity was subsequently correlated with platinum sensitivity. Fifty patients were treated: 48 had germline BRCA1/2 mutations; one had a BRCA2 germline sequence change of unknown significance, and another had a strong family history of BRCA1/2-associated cancers who declined mutation testing. Of the 50 patients, 13 had platinum-sensitive disease, 24 had platinum-resistant disease, and 13 had platinum-refractory disease (according to platinum-free interval). Twenty (40%; 95% CI, 26% to 55%) achieved Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) complete or partial responses and/or tumor marker (CA125) responses, and three (6.0%) maintained RECIST disease stabilization for more than 4 months, giving an overall clinical benefit rate of 46% (95% CI, 32% to 61%). Median response duration was 28 weeks. There was a significant association between the clinical benefit rate and platinum-free interval across the platinum-sensitive, resistant, and refractory subgroups (69%, 45%, and 23%, respectively). Post hoc analyses indicated associations between platinum sensitivity and extent of olaparib response (radiologic change, P = .001; CA125 change, P = .002). Olaparib has antitumor activity in BRCA1/2 mutation ovarian cancer, which is associated with platinum sensitivity.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BMC Med
                BMC Med
                BMC Medicine
                BioMed Central
                1741-7015
                2012
                9 March 2012
                : 10
                : 25
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Bldg. 31, Room 3A-44, 31 Center Drive, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA
                [2 ]Applied/Developmental Research Directorate, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., Bldg. 431, 1050 Boyles St., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD, 21702 USA
                [3 ]Center for Cancer Research, Bldg. 37, Room 1052, 37 Convent Drive, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, 20892 USA
                Article
                1741-7015-10-25
                10.1186/1741-7015-10-25
                3312820
                22401667
                a0fc83f3-11f2-4034-8b10-b625ad5d714c
                Copyright ©2012 Kummar et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Minireview

                Medicine

                parp clinical trials, dna repair, synthetic lethality

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