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      Common signalling pathways in macrophage and osteoclast multinucleation

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      Journal of Cell Science

      The Company of Biologists

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          WNT signaling in bone homeostasis and disease: from human mutations to treatments.

          Low bone mass and strength lead to fragility fractures, for example, in elderly individuals affected by osteoporosis or children with osteogenesis imperfecta. A decade ago, rare human mutations affecting bone negatively (osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome) or positively (high-bone mass phenotype, sclerosteosis and Van Buchem disease) have been identified and found to all reside in components of the canonical WNT signaling machinery. Mouse genetics confirmed the importance of canonical Wnt signaling in the regulation of bone homeostasis, with activation of the pathway leading to increased, and inhibition leading to decreased, bone mass and strength. The importance of WNT signaling for bone has also been highlighted since then in the general population in numerous genome-wide association studies. The pathway is now the target for therapeutic intervention to restore bone strength in millions of patients at risk for fracture. This paper reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms by which WNT signalng regulates bone homeostasis.
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            Cutting edge: TREM-2 attenuates macrophage activation.

            The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM-2) delivers intracellular signals through the adaptor DAP12 to regulate myeloid cell function both within and outside the immune system. The role of TREM-2 in immunity has been obscured by the failure to detect expression of the TREM-2 protein in vivo. In this study, we show that TREM-2 is expressed on macrophages infiltrating the tissues from the circulation and that alternative activation with IL-4 can induce TREM-2. TREM-2 expression is abrogated by macrophage maturation with LPS of IFN-gamma. Using TREM-2(-/-) mice, we find that TREM-2 functions to inhibit cytokine production by macrophages in response to the TLR ligands LPS, zymosan, and CpG. Furthermore, we find that TREM-2 completely accounts for the increased cytokine production previously reported by DAP12(-/-) macrophages. Taken together, these data show that TREM-2 is expressed on newly differentiated and alternatively activated macrophages and functions to restrain macrophage activation.
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              MT1-MMP-deficient mice develop dwarfism, osteopenia, arthritis, and connective tissue disease due to inadequate collagen turnover.

              MT1-MMP is a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase (MT-MMP) capable of mediating pericellular proteolysis of extracellular matrix components. MT1-MMP is therefore thought to be an important molecular tool for cellular remodeling of the surrounding matrix. To establish the biological role of this membrane proteinase we generated MT1-MMP-deficient mice by gene targeting. MT1-MMP deficiency causes craniofacial dysmorphism, arthritis, osteopenia, dwarfism, and fibrosis of soft tissues due to ablation of a collagenolytic activity that is essential for modeling of skeletal and extraskeletal connective tissues. Our findings demonstrate the pivotal function of MT1-MMP in connective tissue metabolism, and illustrate that modeling of the soft connective tissue matrix by resident cells is essential for the development and maintenance of the hard tissues of the skeleton.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Cell Science
                J Cell Sci
                The Company of Biologists
                0021-9533
                1477-9137
                June 05 2018
                June 01 2018
                June 05 2018
                June 01 2018
                : 131
                : 11
                : jcs216267
                Article
                10.1242/jcs.216267
                © 2018

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