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A corpus of noise-induced word misperceptions for English

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      Most cited references 8

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      SUBTLEX-UK: a new and improved word frequency database for British English.

      We present word frequencies based on subtitles of British television programmes. We show that the SUBTLEX-UK word frequencies explain more of the variance in the lexical decision times of the British Lexicon Project than the word frequencies based on the British National Corpus and the SUBTLEX-US frequencies. In addition to the word form frequencies, we also present measures of contextual diversity part-of-speech specific word frequencies, word frequencies in children programmes, and word bigram frequencies, giving researchers of British English access to the full range of norms recently made available for other languages. Finally, we introduce a new measure of word frequency, the Zipf scale, which we hope will stop the current misunderstandings of the word frequency effect.
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        A glimpsing model of speech perception in noise.

         Martin Cooke (2006)
        Do listeners process noisy speech by taking advantage of "glimpses"-spectrotemporal regions in which the target signal is least affected by the background? This study used an automatic speech recognition system, adapted for use with partially specified inputs, to identify consonants in noise. Twelve masking conditions were chosen to create a range of glimpse sizes. Several different glimpsing models were employed, differing in the local signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) used for detection, the minimum glimpse size, and the use of information in the masked regions. Recognition results were compared with behavioral data. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the proportion of the time-frequency plane glimpsed is a good predictor of intelligibility. Recognition scores in each noise condition confirmed that sufficient information exists in glimpses to support consonant identification. Close fits to listeners' performance were obtained at two local SNR thresholds: one at around 8 dB and another in the range -5 to -2 dB. A transmitted information analysis revealed that cues to voicing are degraded more in the model than in human auditory processing.
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          A Speech Intelligibility Index-based approach to predict the speech reception threshold for sentences in fluctuating noise for normal-hearing listeners.

          The SII model in its present form (ANSI S3.5-1997, American National Standards Institute, New York) can accurately describe intelligibility for speech in stationary noise but fails to do so for nonstationary noise maskers. Here, an extension to the SII model is proposed with the aim to predict the speech intelligibility in both stationary and fluctuating noise. The basic principle of the present approach is that both speech and noise signal are partitioned into small time frames. Within each time frame the conventional SII is determined, yielding the speech information available to the listener at that time frame. Next, the SII values of these time frames are averaged, resulting in the SII for that particular condition. Using speech reception threshold (SRT) data from the literature, the extension to the present SII model can give a good account for SRTs in stationary noise, fluctuating speech noise, interrupted noise, and multiple-talker noise. The predictions for sinusoidally intensity modulated (SIM) noise and real speech or speech-like maskers are better than with the original SII model, but are still not accurate. For the latter type of maskers, informational masking may play a role.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
            The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
            Acoustical Society of America (ASA)
            0001-4966
            November 2016
            November 2016
            : 140
            : 5
            : EL458-EL463
            10.1121/1.4967185
            © 2016
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