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      The European Union summary report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and food‐borne outbreaks in 2017

      European Food Safety Authority and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (EFSA and ECDC)

      EFSA Journal

      John Wiley and Sons Inc.

      zoonoses, monitoring, Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria, parasites, food‐borne outbreaks

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          Abstract

          This report of the European Food Safety Authority and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control presents the results of zoonoses monitoring activities carried out in 2017 in 37 European countries (28 Member States ( MS) and nine non‐ MS). Campylobacteriosis was the commonest reported zoonosis and its EU trend for confirmed human cases increasing since 2008 stabilised during 2013–2017. The decreasing EU trend for confirmed human salmonellosis cases since 2008 ended during 2013–2017, and the proportion of human Salmonella Enteritidis cases increased, mostly due to one MS starting to report serotype data. Sixteen MS met all Salmonella reduction targets for poultry, whereas 12 MS failed meeting at least one. The EU flock prevalence of target Salmonella serovars in breeding hens, laying hens, broilers and fattening turkeys decreased or remained stable compared to 2016, and slightly increased in breeding turkeys. Salmonella results on pig carcases and target Salmonella serovar results for poultry from competent authorities tended to be generally higher compared to those from food business operators. The notification rate of human listeriosis further increased in 2017, despite Listeria seldom exceeding the EU food safety limit in ready‐to‐eat food. The decreasing EU trend for confirmed yersiniosis cases since 2008 stabilised during 2013–2017. The number of confirmed shiga toxin‐producing Escherichia coli ( STEC) infections in humans was stable. A total of 5,079 food‐borne (including waterborne) outbreaks were reported. Salmonella was the commonest detected agent with S. Enteritidis causing one out of seven outbreaks, followed by other bacteria, bacterial toxins and viruses. The agent was unknown in 37.6% of all outbreaks. Salmonella in eggs and Salmonella in meat and meat products were the highest risk agent/food pairs. The report further summarises trends and sources for bovine tuberculosis, Brucella, Trichinella, Echinococcus, Toxoplasma, rabies, Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), West Nile virus and tularaemia.

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          Most cited references 95

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          The European Union summary report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and food‐borne outbreaks in 2015

          (2016)
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            European Echinococcosis Registry: Human Alveolar Echinococcosis, Europe, 1982–2000

            Surveillance for alveolar echinococcosis in central Europe was initiated in 1998. On a voluntary basis, 559 patients were reported to the registry. Most cases originated from rural communities in regions from eastern France to western Austria; single cases were reported far away from the disease-“endemic” zone throughout central Europe. Of 210 patients, 61.4% were involved in vocational or part-time farming, gardening, forestry, or hunting. Patients were diagnosed at a mean age of 52.5 years; 78% had symptoms. Alveolar echinococcosis primarily manifested as a liver disease. Of the 559 patients, 190 (34%) were already affected by spread of the parasitic larval tissue. Of 408 (73%) patients alive in 2000, 4.9% were cured. The increasing prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in foxes in rural and urban areas of central Europe and the occurrence of cases outside the alveolar echinococcosis–endemic regions suggest that this disease deserves increased attention.
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              The European Union summary report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and food‐borne outbreaks in 2014

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                EFSA J
                EFSA J
                10.1002/(ISSN)1831-4732
                EFS2
                EFSA Journal
                John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
                1831-4732
                12 December 2018
                December 2018
                : 16
                : 12 ( doiID: 10.1002/efs2.2018.16.issue-12 )
                Author notes
                Article
                EFS25500
                10.2903/j.efsa.2018.5500
                7009540
                © 2018 European Food Safety Authority and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. EFSA Journal published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd on behalf of European Food Safety Authority.

                This is an open access article under the terms of the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/ License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and no modifications or adaptations are made.

                Page count
                Figures: 82, Tables: 74, Pages: 262, Words: 143106
                Product
                Categories
                Scientific Report
                Scientific Report
                Custom metadata
                2.0
                December 2018
                Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_JATSPMC version:5.7.5 mode:remove_FC converted:21.01.2020

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