3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Recent advances in isatin hybrids as potential anticancer agents

      1 , 2 , 1
      Archiv der Pharmazie
      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references117

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          1,2,3-Triazole-containing hybrids as potential anticancer agents: Current developments, action mechanisms and structure-activity relationships

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Polytherapy and Targeted Cancer Drug Resistance

            A current challenge in cancer treatment is drug resistance. Even the most effective therapies often fail to produce complete and durable tumor response and ultimately give rise to therapy resistance and tumor relapse. How resistance arises in cancer remains incompletely understood. While drug resistance in cancer is thought to be driven by irreversible genetic mutations, emerging evidence also implicates reversible proteomic and epigenetic mechanisms in the development of drug resistance. Tumor microenvironment-mediated mechanisms and tumor heterogeneity can significantly contribute to cancer treatment resistance. Here, we discuss the diverse and dynamic strategies that cancers use to evade drug response, the promise of upfront combination and intermittent therapies and therapy switching in forestalling resistance, and epigenetic reprogramming to combat resistance.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Anti-cancer chalcones: Structural and molecular target perspectives.

              Chalcone or (E)-1,3-diphenyl-2-propene-1-one scaffold remained a fascination among researchers in the 21st century due to its simple chemistry, ease of synthesis and a wide variety of promising biological activities. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones have shown anti-cancer activity due to their inhibitory potential against various targets namely ABCG2/P-gp/BCRP, 5α-reductase, aromatase, 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HDAC/Situin-1, proteasome, VEGF, VEGFR-2 kinase, MMP-2/9, JAK/STAT signaling pathways, CDC25B, tubulin, cathepsin-K, topoisomerase-II, Wnt, NF-κB, B-Raf and mTOR etc. In this review, a comprehensive study on molecular targets/pathways involved in carcinogenesis, mechanism of actions (MOAs), structure activity relationships (SARs) and patents granted have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-cancer chalcones.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Archiv der Pharmazie
                Arch Pharm Chem Life Sci
                Wiley
                0365-6233
                1521-4184
                January 09 2020
                March 2020
                January 21 2020
                March 2020
                : 353
                : 3
                : 1900367
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of PharmacyBozhou People's HospitalBozhou China
                [2 ]Department of General PracticeZhuji Affiliated Hospital of Shaoxing UniversityShaoxing China
                Article
                10.1002/ardp.201900367
                a25377ee-2e18-469e-ad57-fd477171426c
                © 2020

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article