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      Moral sensitivity, moral distress, and moral courage among baccalaureate Filipino nursing students

      1
      Nursing Ethics
      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          Background:

          Moral distress, moral sensitivity, and moral courage among healthcare professionals have been explored considerably in recent years. However, there is a paucity of studies exploring these topics among baccalaureate nursing students.

          Aim/objective:

          The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between and among moral distress, moral sensitivity, and moral courage of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students.

          Research design:

          The research employed a descriptive-correlational design to explore the relationships between and among moral distress, moral sensitivity, and moral courage of undergraduate nursing students.

          Participants and research context:

          A total of 293 baccalaureate Filipino nursing students who have been exposed to various clinical areas participated in the study.

          Ethical considerations:

          Institutional review board approval was sought prior to the conduct of the study. Self-determination was assured and anonymity and confidentiality were guaranteed to all participants.

          Findings:

          Results indicate that a majority of the nursing students in the clinical areas encounter morally distressing situations that compromise quality patient care. However, despite the fact that they want to do what is in the best interest of their patients, their perception of being the inexperienced among the healthcare team drives the majority of them to ignore morally distressing situations to avoid conflict and confrontation. Another interesting finding is that 79.20% of the respondents hardly consider quitting the nursing profession even if they frequently encounter morally distressing situations. Analysis also shows associations between moral distress intensity and frequency ( r = 0.13, p < 0.05) and moral distress intensity and moral sensitivity ( r = 0.25, p < 0.05). The dimensions of moral courage are also related to both moral distress and moral sensitivity.

          Conclusion:

          Results of the study imply that moral distress is a reality among all healthcare professionals including nursing students and requires more consideration by nurse educators.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nursing Ethics
          Nurs Ethics
          SAGE Publications
          0969-7330
          1477-0989
          June 2018
          June 29 2016
          June 2018
          : 25
          : 4
          : 458-469
          Affiliations
          [1 ]University of Santo Tomas, Philippines
          Article
          10.1177/0969733016654317
          27364536
          a2a41aa8-6425-4eca-b659-530cda47dabd
          © 2018

          http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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