28
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Landfill leachate contributes per-/poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and pharmaceuticals to municipal wastewater

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Widespread disposal of landfill leachate to municipal sewer in the US calls for improved understanding of the relative organic-chemical contributions to the WWTP waste stream and associated surface-water discharge to receptors in the environment.

          Abstract

          Widespread disposal of landfill leachate to municipal sewer infrastructure in the United States calls for an improved understanding of the relative organic-chemical contributions to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) waste stream and associated surface-water discharge to receptors in the environment. Landfill leachate, WWTP influent, and WWTP effluent samples were collected from three landfill-WWTP systems and compared with analogous influent and effluent samples from two WWTPs that did not receive leachate. Samples were analyzed for 73 per-/poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), 109 pharmaceuticals, and 21 hormones and related compounds. PFAS were detected more frequently in leachate (92%) than in influent (55%). Total PFAS concentrations in leachate (93 100 ng L −1) were more than 10 times higher than in influent (6950 ng L −1) and effluent samples (3730 ng L −1). Concentrations of bisphenol A; the nonprescription pharmaceuticals cotinine, lidocaine, nicotine; and the prescription pharmaceuticals amphetamine, carisoprodol, pentoxifylline, and thiabendazole were an order of magnitude higher in landfill leachate than WWTP influent. Leachate load contributions for PFAS (0.78 to 31 g d −1), bisphenol A (0.97 to 8.3 g d −1), and nonprescription (2.0 to 3.1 g d −1) and prescription (0.48 to 2.5 g d −1) pharmaceuticals to WWTP influent were generally low (<10 g d −1) for most compounds resulting from high influent-to-leachate volumetric ratios (0.983). No clear differences in concentrations were apparent between effluents from WWTPs receiving landfill leachate and those that did not receive landfill leachate.

          Related collections

          Most cited references3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          Determination of human‐use pharmaceuticals in filtered water by direct aqueous injection: High‐performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Book: not found

            Determination of steroid hormones and related compounds in filtered and unfiltered water by solid-phase extraction, derivatization, and gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry

            Foreman (2012)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Dataset: not found

              Target-Chemical Concentrations in Landfill Leachate and Wastewater Treatment Influent and Effluent

              Concentration results and quality assurance for pharmaceutical, hormone, and per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) analyzed in landfill leachate and wastewater influent and effluent. Samples were collected between July and October 2016, using U.S. Geological Survey field methods. Water-quality samples for pharmaceutical and hormone compounds (reported in nanograms per liter; ng/L) were analyzed at the U.S. Geological Survey, National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colorado. Samples for PFAS compounds (reported in ng/L) were analyzed at the Oregon State University Environmental and Molecular Toxicology Field Laboratory, College of Agricultural Sciences.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                ESWRAR
                Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
                Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                2053-1400
                2053-1419
                May 7 2020
                2020
                : 6
                : 5
                : 1300-1311
                Affiliations
                [1 ]U.S. Geological Survey
                [2 ]Oklahoma City
                [3 ]USA
                [4 ]Iowa City
                [5 ]Reston
                [6 ]Lawrenceville
                [7 ]Environmental Research & Education Foundation
                [8 ]Raleigh
                [9 ]Oregon State University
                [10 ]Corvallis
                [11 ]Lakewood
                [12 ]Brown and Caldwell
                [13 ]Maitland
                [14 ]University of Central Florida
                [15 ]Orlando
                [16 ]Columbia
                Article
                10.1039/D0EW00045K
                a33117a3-75a3-44a2-a839-fd93927d1408
                © 2020

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article