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      Interventions for non-tubal ectopic pregnancy

      1 , 2 , 1 , 3 , 1 , 1 , 1
      Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group
      Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
      Wiley

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          Sites of ectopic pregnancy: a 10 year population-based study of 1800 cases.

          Several risk factors for ectopic pregnancy (EP) have been identified, but the site of implantation of EP has been little studied. A total of 1800 surgically treated EP was registered between January 1992 and December 2001 in the Auvergne EP register and the women concerned were followed up. In this large population-based sample, we studied the distribution of EP sites, immediate complications, determining factors, and subsequent fertility. EP sites were interstitial (2.4%), isthmic (12.0%), ampullary (70.0%), fimbrial (11.1%), ovarian (3.2%) or abdominal (1.3%). No cervical pregnancies were observed. Complications and treatment depended on the site of EP. In multivariate analysis, the only risk factor associated with EP site was current use of an intrauterine device (IUD), which was more frequent in distal EP. The 2 year cumulative rate of subsequent spontaneous intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) increased progressively from interstitial to ovarian EP. Fair concordance (weighted kappa = 0.31) was observed between the sites of two successive EP if they were homolateral. In addition to providing an accurate description of the sites of implantation of EP, this study shows that current IUD use 'protects' against interstitial pregnancies, which are the most difficult to manage. It shows that subsequent fertility tends to be higher in women with distal EP.
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            Inequities in the use of cesarean section deliveries in the world.

            The purpose of this study was to describe the unequal distribution in the performance of cesarean section delivery (CS) in the world and the resource-use implications of such inequity. We obtained data on the number of CSs performed in 137 countries in 2008. The consensus is that countries should achieve a 10% rate of CS; therefore, for countries that are below that rate, we calculated the cost to achieve a 10% rate. For countries with a CS rate of >15%, we calculated the savings that could be made by the achievement of a 15% rate. Fifty-four countries had CS rates of 15%. The cost of the global saving by a reduction of CS rates to 15% was estimated to be $2.32 billion (US dollars); the cost to attain a 10% CS rate was $432 million (US dollars). CSs that are potentially medically unjustified appear to command a disproportionate share of global economic resources. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Cesarean scar pregnancy: a systematic review of treatment studies.

              To study treatment modalities for cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs), focusing on efficacy and complications in relation to study quality.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                146518
                Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
                Wiley
                14651858
                July 01 2020
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University; Chengdu China
                [2 ]Key Laboratory of Birth Defects and Related Diseases of Women and Children (Sichuan University); Ministry of Education; Chengdu China
                [3 ]Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University; Chengdu China
                Article
                10.1002/14651858.CD011174.pub2
                32609376
                a3330465-d44a-4308-b772-442a7b4621b0
                © 2020
                History

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