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      After four decades—Occurrence of the daggertooth pike conger, Muraenesox cinereus (Actinopterygii: Anguilliformes: Muraenesocidae), in the Mediterranean Sea

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      Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          In October 2020, a single specimen of the daggertooth pike conger, Muraenesox cinereus (Forsskål, 1775), was caught by longline at a depth of 120 m, from the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. This species has been recorded from the Mediterranean for the second time after approximately four decades. This new finding shows that the distribution of the species has expanded.

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          Most cited references 14

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          Alien Marine Fishes Deplete Algal Biomass in the Eastern Mediterranean

          One of the most degraded states of the Mediterranean rocky infralittoral ecosystem is a barren composed solely of bare rock and patches of crustose coralline algae. Barrens are typically created by the grazing action of large sea urchin populations. In 2008 we observed extensive areas almost devoid of erect algae, where sea urchins were rare, on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. To determine the origin of those urchin-less ‘barrens’, we conducted a fish exclusion experiment. We found that, in the absence of fish grazing, a well-developed algal assemblage grew within three months. Underwater fish censuses and observations suggest that two alien herbivorous fish from the Red Sea (Siganus luridus and S. rivulatus) are responsible for the creation and maintenance of these benthic communities with extremely low biomass. The shift from well-developed native algal assemblages to ‘barrens’ implies a dramatic decline in biogenic habitat complexity, biodiversity and biomass. A targeted Siganus fishery could help restore the macroalgal beds of the rocky infralittoral on the Turkish coast.
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            East is east and West is west? Management of marine bioinvasions in the Mediterranean Sea

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              Fishes of the North-Eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Vol. 1

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria
                AIeP
                Pensoft Publishers
                1734-1515
                0137-1592
                September 09 2021
                September 09 2021
                : 51
                : 3
                : 245-248
                Article
                10.3897/aiep.51.65703
                © 2021

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