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      Diastolic Function in Several Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Tissue Doppler Imaging Study

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          Abstract

          Background: This study evaluates the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction (DD) in several stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Methods: 107 ADPKD patients performed echocardiographic and Doppler studies and a tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) study. Patients were divided in three groups: group 1, 57 patients with CKD stage I, group 2, 37 patients in stages II and III, and group 3, 13 patients with CKD stages IV and V (not on dialysis). Results: In transmitral Doppler, 1 patient in group 1 compared to 5 in group 2, and 4 in group 3 exhibited DD (p < 0.005); moreover, E/A ratio decreases progressively from group 1 to 3 (p < 0.0001). In TDI, DD was observed in 8 patients in group 1, 17 in group 2, and 8 in group 3 had DD (p < 0.001). Em velocity, the best TDI parameter for DD, correlated with age, renal function and blood pressure. When adjusted for age, increased left ventricular mass index and decreased renal function were independent risk factors of DD. Conclusions: DD occurred progressively as renal function deteriorates in patients with ADPKD and this effect is independently related to age and blood pressure.

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          Most cited references 14

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          Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular hypertrophy: comparison to necropsy findings.

          To determine the accuracy of echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) dimension and mass measurements for detection and quantification of LV hypertrophy, results of blindly read antemortem echocardiograms were compared with LV mass measurements made at necropsy in 55 patients. LV mass was calculated using M-mode LV measurements by Penn and American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) conventions and cube function and volume correction formulas in 52 patients. Penn-cube LV mass correlated closely with necropsy LV mass (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) and overestimated it by only 6%; sensitivity in 18 patients with LV hypertrophy (necropsy LV mass more than 215 g) was 100% (18 of 18 patients) and specificity was 86% (29 of 34 patients). ASE-cube LV mass correlated similarly to necropsy LV mass (r = 0.90, p less than 0.001), but systematically overestimated it (by a mean of 25%); the overestimation could be corrected by the equation: LV mass = 0.80 (ASE-cube LV mass) + 0.6 g. Use of ASE measurements in the volume correction formula systematically underestimated necropsy LV mass (by a mean of 30%). In a subset of 9 patients, 3 of whom had technically inadequate M-mode echocardiograms, 2-dimensional echocardiographic (echo) LV mass by 2 methods was also significantly related to necropsy LV mass (r = 0.68, p less than 0.05 and r = 0.82, p less than 0.01). Among other indexes of LV anatomy, only measurement of myocardial cross-sectional area was acceptably accurate for quantitation of LV mass (r = 0.80, p less than 0.001) or diagnosis of LV hypertrophy (sensitivity = 72%, specificity = 94%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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            New Doppler echocardiographic applications for the study of diastolic function.

            Doppler echocardiography is one of the most useful clinical tools for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. Doppler indices of LV filling and pulmonary venous (PV) flow are used not only for diagnostic purposes but also for establishing prognosis and evaluating the effect of therapeutic interventions. The utility of these indices is limited, however, by the confounding effects of different physiologic variables such as LV relaxation, compliance and filling pressure. Since alterations in these variables result in changes in Doppler indices of opposite direction, it is often difficult to determine the status of a given variable when a specific Doppler filling pattern is observed. Recently, color M-mode and tissue Doppler have provided useful insights in the study of diastolic function. These new Doppler applications have been shown to provide an accurate estimate of LV relaxation and appear to be relatively insensitive to the effects of preload compensation. This review will focus on the complementary role of color M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography and traditional Doppler indices of LV filling and PV flow in the assessment of diastolic function.
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              Clinical practice. Diastolic heart failure.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                KBR
                Kidney Blood Press Res
                10.1159/issn.1420-4096
                Kidney and Blood Pressure Research
                S. Karger AG
                1420-4096
                1423-0143
                2007
                July 2007
                15 June 2007
                : 30
                : 4
                : 234-239
                Affiliations
                aServiço de Nefrologia e Transplantação Renal, bServiço de Cardiologia, Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisboa, Portugal
                Article
                104092 Kidney Blood Press Res 2007;30:234–239
                10.1159/000104092
                17575469
                © 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 3, References: 27, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Original Paper

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