0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Whistling invaders: Status and distribution of Johnstone’s Whistling frog (Eleutherodactylus johnstonei Barbour, 1914), 25 years after its introduction to Colombia

      , ,

      NeoBiota

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Despite increased attention to the problem of alien amphibian invasions, systematic assessments of the actual invasion status and potential, required to estimate possible environmental and economic impacts of introduced species, are often missing. A prime example is Johnstone’s Whistling Frog ( Eleutherodactylusjohnstonei), a Caribbean native that now occurs widely throughout the South American mainland, including Colombia. We conducted the first systematic and comprehensive countrywide assessment of the introduction status of the species in Colombia, combining both intensive field surveys, as well as a first population genetic analysis. The species was strictly confined to urban habitats with specific environmental conditions (plant nurseries and private gardens) and did not show any signs of dispersal into the extra-urban matrix. Genetic data support previously hypothesised independent introduction events in the Andes and along the Caribbean Coast and shed light on potential dispersal pathways. The results of this study challenge both the active spread, as well as the broad environmental tolerance hypothesis previously suggested, to explain the observed range extension. A critical reassessment of the categorisation of the species as highly invasive under IUCN-ISSG standards is required.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 15

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Wildlife disease. Recent introduction of a chytrid fungus endangers Western Palearctic salamanders.

          Emerging infectious diseases are reducing biodiversity on a global scale. Recently, the emergence of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans resulted in rapid declines in populations of European fire salamanders. Here, we screened more than 5000 amphibians from across four continents and combined experimental assessment of pathogenicity with phylogenetic methods to estimate the threat that this infection poses to amphibian diversity. Results show that B. salamandrivorans is restricted to, but highly pathogenic for, salamanders and newts (Urodela). The pathogen likely originated and remained in coexistence with a clade of salamander hosts for millions of years in Asia. As a result of globalization and lack of biosecurity, it has recently been introduced into naïve European amphibian populations, where it is currently causing biodiversity loss. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Rapid expansion of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) invasion front in tropical Australia

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Phylogeny and Classification of Poison Frogs (Amphibia: Dendrobatidae), Based on Mitochondrial 16S and 12S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequences

              An analysis of partial sequences of the 16S ribosomal rRNA gene (582 bp) of 20 poison frog species (Dendrobatidae) confirmed their phylogenetic relationships to bufonid and leptodactylid frogs. Representatives of the ranoid families and subfamilies Raninae, Mantellinae, Petropedetinae, Cacosterninae, Arthroleptidae, Astylosternidae, and Microhylidae did not cluster as sister group of the Dendrobatidae. Similar results were obtained in an analysis using a partial sequence of the 12S gene (350 bp) in a reduced set of taxa and in a combined analysis. Within the Dendrobatidae, our data supported monophyly of the genus Phyllobates but indicated paraphyly of Epipedobates and Colostethus. Minyobates clustered within Dendrobates, contradicting its previously assumed phylogenetic position. Phobobates species clustered as a monophyletic unit within Epipedobates. Allobates was positioned in a group containing two Colostethus species, indicating that lack of amplexus, presence of skin alkaloids, and aposematic coloration evolved independently in Allobates and the remaining aposematic dendrobatids.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NeoBiota
                NB
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2488
                1619-0033
                April 18 2019
                April 18 2019
                : 45
                : 39-54
                Article
                10.3897/neobiota.45.33515
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article