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      Approaches of Improving Food Allergy Knowledge: Children with food allergy’s quality of life

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      Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal
      e-IPH Ltd.

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          Abstract

          The food allergy commonly affected many people regardless of their age, especially among children. Their life could be dangerous if they are exposed to the food allergen because it will lead to life-threatening. Therefore, the nursery employees need to take extra precaution when dealing with children with food allergy as compared to ordinary children. Thus, this paper warrants to assess the knowledge of the person handling the food allergy children and determination of several approaches is needed to improve their understanding of managing this susceptible population.

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          Most cited references19

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          Food allergy

          Food allergies manifest in a variety of clinical conditions within the gastrointestinal tract, skin and lungs, with the most dramatic and sometimes fatal manifestation being anaphylactic shock. Major progress has been made in basic, translational and clinical research, leading to a better understanding of the underlying immunological mechanisms that lead to the breakdown of clinical and immunological tolerance against food antigens, which can result in either immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated reactions or non-IgE-mediated reactions. Lifestyle factors, dietary habits and maternal-neonatal interactions play a pivotal part in triggering the onset of food allergies, including qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbiota. These factors seem to have the greatest influence early in life, an observation that has led to the generation of hypotheses to explain the food allergy epidemic, including the dual-allergen exposure hypothesis. These hypotheses have fuelled research in preventive strategies that seek to establish desensitization to allergens and/or tolerance to allergens in affected individuals. Allergen-nonspecific therapeutic strategies have also been investigated in a number of clinical trials, which will eventually improve the treatment options for patients with food allergy.
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            Eczematous reactions to food in atopic eczema: position paper of the EAACI and GA2LEN.

            Food allergy and atopic eczema (AE) may occur in the same patient. Besides typical immediate types of allergic reactions (i.e. noneczematous reactions) which are observed in patients suffering from AE, it is clear that foods, such as cow's milk and hen's eggs, can directly provoke flares of AE, particularly in sensitized infants. In general, inhaled allergens and pollen-related foods are of greater importance in older children, adolescents and adults. Clinical studies have revealed that more than 50% of affected children with AE that can be exacerbated by certain foods will react with a worsening of skin eczema either alone or in addition to immediate symptoms. Adolescents and adults may also react to foods, but reactions to 'classical' food allergens, such as hen's eggs and cow's milk, are not as common as in childhood. Some patients with AE do react to pollen-associated foods. Food-induced eczema should not be neglected by the allergologist: On the one hand, food can be a relevant trigger factor of persistent moderate-to-severe AE; on the other hand, unnecessary diets which are not based on a proper diagnosis may lead to malnutrition and additional psychological stress on patients suffering from AE. Eczematous reactions to food can only be diagnosed by a thorough diagnostic procedure, taking into account the patient's history, the degree of sensitization and the clinical relevance of the sensitization. The latter has often to be proven by oral food challenges. Upon oral food challenge it is most important to evaluate the status of the skin with an established score (e.g. SCORAD, EASI) after 24 h and later because otherwise worsening of eczema will be missed.
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              Prevalence of clinic-defined food allergy in early adolescence: The SchoolNuts study

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal
                E-BPJ
                e-IPH Ltd.
                2398-4287
                March 02 2018
                March 02 2018
                : 3
                : 7
                : 13
                Article
                10.21834/e-bpj.v3i7.1317
                a3959336-2856-4719-ab45-363781ae6fd9
                © 2018

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/


                Psychology,Urban design & Planning,Urban studies,General behavioral science,Cultural studies

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