74
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Staphylococcus aureus infections: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical infections. It is a leading cause of bacteremia and infective endocarditis as well as osteoarticular, skin and soft tissue, pleuropulmonary, and device-related infections. This review comprehensively covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of each of these clinical entities. The past 2 decades have witnessed two clear shifts in the epidemiology of S. aureus infections: first, a growing number of health care-associated infections, particularly seen in infective endocarditis and prosthetic device infections, and second, an epidemic of community-associated skin and soft tissue infections driven by strains with certain virulence factors and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. In reviewing the literature to support management strategies for these clinical manifestations, we also highlight the paucity of high-quality evidence for many key clinical questions.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Clin. Microbiol. Rev.
          Clinical microbiology reviews
          1098-6618
          0893-8512
          Jul 2015
          : 28
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Global and Tropical Health, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia Steven.Tong@menzies.edu.au vance.fowler@duke.edu.
          [2 ] Global and Tropical Health, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.
          [3 ] Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
          [4 ] Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA Steven.Tong@menzies.edu.au vance.fowler@duke.edu.
          Article
          28/3/603
          10.1128/CMR.00134-14
          26016486
          a3ce17f8-e428-4196-a390-74245273abfe
          Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article