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      Service with Emoticons: How Customers Interpret Employee Use of Emoticons in Online Service Encounters

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      Journal of Consumer Research

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Most cited references 31

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          Agency and communion from the perspective of self versus others.

          On the basis of previous research, the authors hypothesize that (a) person descriptive terms can be organized into the broad dimensions of agency and communion of which communion is the primary one; (b) the main distinction between these dimensions pertains to their profitability for the self (agency) vs. for other persons (communion); hence, agency is more desirable and important in the self-perspective, and communion is more desirable and important in the other-perspective; (c) self-other outcome dependency increases importance of another person's agency. Study 1 showed that a large number of trait names can be reduced to these broad dimensions, that communion comprises more item variance, and that agency is predicted by self-profitability and communion by other-profitability. Studies 2 and 3 showed that agency is more relevant and desired for self, and communion is more relevant and desired for others. Study 4 showed that agency is more important in a close friend than an unrelated peer, and this difference is completely mediated by the perceived outcome dependency. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.
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            Emotion in the Workplace: A Reappraisal

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              Fundamental dimensions of social judgment: understanding the relations between judgments of competence and warmth.

              In seems there are two dimensions that underlie most judgments of traits, people, groups, and cultures. Although the definitions vary, the first makes reference to attributes such as competence, agency, and individualism, and the second to warmth, communality, and collectivism. But the relationship between the two dimensions seems unclear. In trait and person judgment, they are often positively related; in group and cultural stereotypes, they are often negatively related. The authors report 4 studies that examine the dynamic relationship between these two dimensions, experimentally manipulating the location of a target of judgment on one and examining the consequences for the other. In general, the authors' data suggest a negative dynamic relationship between the two, moderated by factors the impact of which they explore. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Consumer Research
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0093-5301
                1537-5277
                February 2019
                February 01 2019
                March 08 2018
                February 2019
                February 01 2019
                March 08 2018
                : 45
                : 5
                : 973-987
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Marketing, School of Business, Hong Kong Baptist University, Renfrew Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong
                [2 ]Faculty of Business and Economics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
                Article
                10.1093/jcr/ucy016
                © 2018

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