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      Social Work Challenge: Sex Workers and their Families in Prague and South Bohemia Region

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      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          Objective: There is a lack of information related to women sex workers and their families in Prague and South Bohemia Region. We tried to explore how the relationship is between the women and their primary families.Design: Qualitative and exploratory study.Participants: 37 women working in private sex business in the South Bohemian Region and the Capital Prague (Czech Republic). The age structure of the women was 20-55 years; the average age was 27 year.Methods: Questioning method, technique of biographic-narrative interview. The interviews were verbatim transcribed and after that analyzed in the Atlas.Ti PC program using grounded theory.Results: The data analysis showed that the sexual workers came from various families with significantly disturbed relationships with them. The family does not know about the sex work.Conclusion: The family environment can create sufficient support that Social Workers can use to work with sex workers.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Prostitution, violence, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

          One hundred and thirty people working as prostitutes in San Francisco were interviewed regarding the extent of violence in their lives and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fifty-seven percent reported that they had been sexually assaulted as children and 49% reported that they had been physically assaulted as children. As adults in prostitution, 82% had been physically assaulted; 83% had been threatened with a weapon; 68% had been raped while working as prostitutes; and 84% reported current or past homelessness. We differentiated the types of lifetime violence as childhood sexual assault; childhood physical abuse; rape in prostitution; and other (non-rape) physical assault in prostitution. PTSD severity was significantly associated with the total number of types of lifetime violence (r = .21, p = .02); with childhood physical abuse (t = 2.97, p = .004); rape in adult prostitution (Student's t = 2.77, p = .01); and the total number of times raped in prostitution (Kruskal-Wallace chi square = 13.51, p = .01). Of the 130 people interviewed, 68% met DSM III-R criteria for a diagnosis of PTSD. Eighty-eight percent of these respondents stated that they wanted to leave prostitution, and described what they needed in order to escape.
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            Et Tú Brutè?

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              Drivers of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Three Refugee Camps

              This qualitative study examined the "drivers" of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women in displacement to identify protective factors and patterns of risk. Qualitative data were collected in three refugee camps in South Sudan, Kenya, and Iraq ( N = 284). Findings revealed interrelated factors that triggered and perpetuated IPV: gendered social norms and roles, destabilization of gender norms and roles, men's substance use, women's separation from family, and rapid remarriages and forced marriages. These factors paint a picture of individual, family, community and societal processes that exacerbate women's risk of IPV in extreme conditions created by displacement. Implications for policy and practice are indicated.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                cswhi
                Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                2222386X
                20769741
                July 30 2018
                July 28 2018
                July 30 2018
                July 28 2018
                : 9
                : 2
                : 75-80
                Article
                10.22359/cswhi_9_2_11
                © 2018

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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