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      Interpersonal violence, early life adversity, and suicidal behavior in hypersexual men

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          Abstract

          Background and aims

          There are significant gaps in knowledge regarding the role of childhood adversity, interpersonal violence, and suicidal behavior in hypersexual disorder (HD). The aim of this study was to investigate interpersonal violence in hypersexual men compared with healthy volunteers and the experience of violence in relation to suicidal behavior.

          Methods

          This case–control study includes 67 male patients with HD and 40 healthy male volunteers. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire – Short Form (CTQ-SF) and the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) were used for assessing early life adversity and interpersonal violence in childhood and in adult life. Suicidal behavior (attempts and ideation) was assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (version 6.0) and the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale – Self-rating.

          Results

          Hypersexual men reported more exposure to violence in childhood and more violent behavior as adults compared with healthy volunteers. Suicide attempters ( n = 8, 12%) reported higher KIVS total score, more used violence as a child, more exposure to violence as an adult as well as higher score on CTQ-SF subscale measuring sexual abuse (SA) compared with hypersexual men without suicide attempt.

          Discussion

          Hypersexuality was associated with interpersonal violence with higher total scores in patients with a history of suicide attempt. The KIVS subscale exposure to interpersonal violence as a child was validated using the CTQ-SF but can be complemented with questions focusing on SA for full assessment of early life adversity.

          Conclusion

          Childhood adversity is an important factor in HD and interpersonal violence might be related to suicidal behavior in hypersexual men.

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          Most cited references 36

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          Development and validation of a brief screening version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire.

          The goal of this study was to develop and validate a short form of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (the CTQ-SF) as a screening measure for maltreatment histories in both clinical and nonreferred groups. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the 70 original CTQ items were used to create a 28-item version of the scale (25 clinical items and three validity items) and test the measurement invariance of the 25 clinical items across four samples: 378 adult substance abusing patients from New York City, 396 adolescent psychiatric inpatients, 625 substance abusing individuals from southwest Texas, and 579 individuals from a normative community sample (combined N=1978). Results showed that the CTQ-SF's items held essentially the same meaning across all four samples (i.e., measurement invariance). Moreover, the scale demonstrated good criterion-related validity in a subsample of adolescents on whom corroborative data were available. These findings support the viability of the CTQ-SF across diverse clinical and nonreferred populations.
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            Hypersexual disorder: a proposed diagnosis for DSM-V.

             M Kafka (2010)
            Hypersexual Disorder is proposed as a new psychiatric disorder for consideration in the Sexual Disorders section for DSM-V. Historical precedents describing hypersexual behaviors as well as the antecedent representations and proposals for inclusion of such a condition in the previous DSM manuals are reviewed. Epidemiological as well as clinical evidence is presented suggesting that non-paraphilic "excesses" of sexual behavior (i.e., hypersexual behaviors and disorders) can be accompanied by both clinically significant personal distress and social and medical morbidity. The research literature describing comorbid Axis I and Axis II psychiatric disorders and a purported relationship between Axis I disorders and Hypersexual Disorder is discussed. Based on an extensive review of the literature, Hypersexual Disorder is conceptualized as primarily a nonparaphilic sexual desire disorder with an impulsivity component. Specific polythetic diagnostic criteria, as well as behavioral specifiers, are proposed, intended to integrate empirically based contributions from various putative pathophysiological perspectives, including dysregulation of sexual arousal and desire, sexual impulsivity, sexual addiction, and sexual compulsivity.
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              A power primer.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jba
                JBA
                Journal of Behavioral Addictions
                J Behav Addict
                Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
                2062-5871
                2063-5303
                02 May 2017
                June 2017
                : 6
                : 2
                : 187-193
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ]Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
                [ 2 ]Medical School, University of Cyprus , Nicosia, Cyprus
                [ 3 ]Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm, Sweden
                [ 4 ]Department of Clinical Sciences/Psychiatry, Umeå University , Umeå, Sweden
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: Andreas Chatzittofis; Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden; Phone: +46 7 00289786; Fax: +46 8 303706; E-mail: andreas.chatzittofis@ 123456ki.se
                Article
                10.1556/2006.6.2017.027
                5520124
                28467102
                © 2017 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 5, Equations: 0, References: 32, Pages: 7
                Funding
                Funding sources: Funding for this study was provided by the Swedish Research Council (Project numbers: K2009-61P-21304-04-4 and K2009-61X-21305-01-1) and through the Regional Agreement on Medical Training and Clinical Research (ALF) between Stockholm County Council and Karolinska Institutet.
                Categories
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