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      Designing for affective warnings & cautions to protect against online misinformation threats

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      34th British HCI Conference (HCI2021)

      Post-pandemic HCI – Living Digitally

      20th - 21st July 2021

      Misinformation, Warning, Caution, Affective, Visualisation effects, Awareness, Perception

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          Abstract

          Social media’s affordance for misinformation is compromising the glue that holds us and our society together. By influencing and manipulating our human behaviour particularly the decisions we make and opinions we form, it is polarising our existence in not only the virtual but also the physical world in which we live. Yet, despite being aware of the destructive nature of misinformation in general, many of us still don’t seem to understand/ see the full danger on an individual basis. Hence, as we have witnessed during Covid 19, many people still continue to share this misinformation widely. The authors of this paper feel that there is an urgent need to support people in being more aware of false information whilst online. In this paper, we share thoughts around some of the mechanisms that people currently use to identify misinformation online. In particular, the focus is on a study that explores participant’s experiences of ten different visualisation effects on a Facebook page. The findings highlight that some of these initial visualisation designs are more effective than the others in informing people that something is not quite what it should be. Like in the physical world, we propose the design of a set of affective online visual warnings and cautions that we hope can be further developed to fight online misinformation and counter it’s current negative influence on society.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Fighting COVID-19 Misinformation on Social Media: Experimental Evidence for a Scalable Accuracy-Nudge Intervention

          Across two studies with more than 1,700 U.S. adults recruited online, we present evidence that people share false claims about COVID-19 partly because they simply fail to think sufficiently about whether or not the content is accurate when deciding what to share. In Study 1, participants were far worse at discerning between true and false content when deciding what they would share on social media relative to when they were asked directly about accuracy. Furthermore, greater cognitive reflection and science knowledge were associated with stronger discernment. In Study 2, we found that a simple accuracy reminder at the beginning of the study (i.e., judging the accuracy of a non-COVID-19-related headline) nearly tripled the level of truth discernment in participants’ subsequent sharing intentions. Our results, which mirror those found previously for political fake news, suggest that nudging people to think about accuracy is a simple way to improve choices about what to share on social media.
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            An Integrative Model of Organizational Trust

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              What Makes Online Content Viral?

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2021
                July 2021
                : 116-120
                Affiliations
                Cardiff School of Technologies

                Cardiff Met University

                Llandaff Campus,

                Western Avenue, Cardiff, CF5 2YB

                Wales
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2021.11
                © Carroll et al. Published by BCS Learning & Development Ltd. Proceedings of the BCS 34th British HCI Conference 2021, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                34th British HCI Conference
                HCI2021
                34
                London, UK
                20th - 21st July 2021
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Post-pandemic HCI – Living Digitally
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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