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      T and B cell subsets differentially correlate with amyloid deposition and neurocognitive function in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment after one year of physical activity

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          Abstract

          Individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) experience cognitive declines in learning and memory greater than expected for normal aging, and are at a high risk of dementia. We previously reported that sedentary aMCI patients exhibited neuroinflammation that correlated with brain amyloid beta (Aβ) burden, as determined by 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET). These aMCI patients enrolled in a one-year randomized control trial (AETMCI, [Related object:]) to test the beneficial effects of 12 months of moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise training (AET) or stretching/toning (ST) control intervention on neurocognitive function. A subset of aMCI participants had PET imaging, cognitive testing, and immunophenotyping of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood after AET or ST interventions. As adaptive immune responses were similar between AET and ST groups, we combined AET/ST into a general ‘physical activity’ (PA) group and compared Aβ burden, cognitive function, and adaptive immune cell subsets to sedentary lifestyle before intervention. We found that PA-induced immunomodulation of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells in CSF correlated with changes in Aβ burden in brain regions associated with executive function. Furthermore, after PA, cognitive scores on tests of memory, processing speed, attention, verbal fluency, and executive function were associated with increased percent representation of circulating naïve B cells and CD8 + T cells. We review the literature on aMCI-related cognition and immune changes as they relate to exercise, and highlight how our preliminary data suggest a complex interplay between the adaptive immune system, physical activity, cognition, and Aβ burden in aMCI.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          9505535
          20591
          Exerc Immunol Rev
          Exerc Immunol Rev
          Exercise immunology review
          1077-5552
          18 September 2019
          2019
          23 September 2019
          : 25
          : 34-49
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Dept. of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA
          [2 ]Dept. of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA
          [3 ]Dept. of Surgery, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA
          [4 ]Dept. of Immunology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA
          [5 ]Insitute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, 7232 Greenville Ave., Dallas, TX, 75231, USA
          [6 ]Dept. of Neurology, University of Kentucky, 741 S. Limestone St, Lexington, KY, 40506, USA
          Author notes
          Corresponding Author: Dr. Ann M. Stowe, University of Kentucky; ann.stowe@ 123456uky.edu
          Article
          PMC6756851 PMC6756851 6756851 nihpa1050939
          6756851
          30785868
          a4ba704c-7bf0-4157-818a-2e8198b335ad
          History
          Categories
          Article

          PET amyloid imaging,lymphocytes,adaptive immunity,physical activity,amnestic mild cognitive impairment

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