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      Host effects on microbiota community assembly

      1 , 1

      Journal of Animal Ecology

      Wiley

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          Most cited references 26

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          Microbial biogeography: putting microorganisms on the map.

          We review the biogeography of microorganisms in light of the biogeography of macroorganisms. A large body of research supports the idea that free-living microbial taxa exhibit biogeographic patterns. Current evidence confirms that, as proposed by the Baas-Becking hypothesis, 'the environment selects' and is, in part, responsible for spatial variation in microbial diversity. However, recent studies also dispute the idea that 'everything is everywhere'. We also consider how the processes that generate and maintain biogeographic patterns in macroorganisms could operate in the microbial world.
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            The gut bacteria of insects: nonpathogenic interactions.

            The diversity of the Insecta is reflected in the large and varied microbial communities inhabiting the gut. Studies, particularly with termites and cockroaches, have focused on the nutritional contributions of gut bacteria in insects living on suboptimal diets. The indigenous gut bacteria, however, also play a role in withstanding the colonization of the gut by non-indigenous species including pathogens. Gut bacterial consortia adapt by the transfer of plasmids and transconjugation between bacterial strains, and some insect species provide ideal conditions for bacterial conjugation, which suggests that the gut is a "hot spot" for gene transfer. Genomic analysis provides new avenues for the study of the gut microbial community and will reveal the molecular foundations of the relationships between the insect and its microbiome. In this review the intestinal bacteria is discussed in the context of developing our understanding of symbiotic relationships, of multitrophic interactions between insects and plant or animal host, and in developing new strategies for controlling insect pests.
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              Reciprocal gut microbiota transplants from zebrafish and mice to germ-free recipients reveal host habitat selection.

              The gut microbiotas of zebrafish and mice share six bacterial divisions, although the specific bacteria within these divisions differ. To test how factors specific to host gut habitat shape microbial community structure, we performed reciprocal transplantations of these microbiotas into germ-free zebrafish and mouse recipients. The results reveal that communities are assembled in predictable ways. The transplanted community resembles its community of origin in terms of the lineages present, but the relative abundance of the lineages changes to resemble the normal gut microbial community composition of the recipient host. Thus, differences in community structure between zebrafish and mice arise in part from distinct selective pressures imposed within the gut habitat of each host. Nonetheless, vertebrate responses to microbial colonization of the gut are ancient: Functional genomic studies disclosed shared host responses to their compositionally distinct microbial communities and distinct microbial species that elicit conserved responses.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Animal Ecology
                J Anim Ecol
                Wiley
                00218790
                March 2018
                March 2018
                November 13 2017
                : 87
                : 2
                : 331-340
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Integrative Biology (IBZ); ETH Zurich; Zurich Switzerland
                Article
                10.1111/1365-2656.12768
                © 2017

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