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      Loss of Renal Phosphate Wasting in a Child with Autosomal Dominant Hypophosphatemic Rickets Caused by a FGF23 Mutation

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          Abstract

          A girl with autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets, presented with clinical, radiological and laboratory signs of rickets at the age of 11 months. She showed a good response to the treatment with low doses of oral phosphate and calcitriol. Surprisingly, she lost her renal phosphate wasting at the age of 8 years, indicating that the disturbed phosphate metabolism can be compensated by hormonal or other factors.

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          Most cited references 2

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          Autosomal dominant hypophosphataemic rickets is associated with mutations in FGF23.

            (2000)
          Proper serum phosphate concentrations are maintained by a complex and poorly understood process. Identification of genes responsible for inherited disorders involving disturbances in phosphate homeostasis may provide insight into the pathways that regulate phosphate balance. Several hereditary disorders of isolated phosphate wasting have been described, including X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (XLH), hypophosphataemic bone disease (HBD), hereditary hypophosphataemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH) and autosomal dominant hypophosphataemic rickets (ADHR). Inactivating mutations of the gene PHEX, encoding a member of the neutral endopeptidase family of proteins, are responsible for XLH (refs 6,7). ADHR (MIM 193100) is characterized by low serum phosphorus concentrations, rickets, osteomalacia, lower extremity deformities, short stature, bone pain and dental abscesses. Here we describe a positional cloning approach used to identify the ADHR gene which included the annotation of 37 genes within 4 Mb of genomic sequence. We identified missense mutations in a gene encoding a new member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, FGF23. These mutations in patients with ADHR represent the first mutations found in a human FGF gene.
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            Localization of a Renal Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Gene to Human Chromosome 5q35

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              Author and article information

              Journal
              HRE
              Horm Res Paediatr
              10.1159/issn.1663-2818
              Hormone Research in Paediatrics
              S. Karger AG
              1663-2818
              1663-2826
              2001
              2001
              18 January 2002
              : 55
              : 6
              : 305-308
              Affiliations
              aDepartment of Pediatrics, Medical University of Lübeck, bDepartment of Pediatrics, Göppingen, and cDepartment of Human Genetics, Technische Universität München und GSF Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg, München, Germany
              Article
              50018 Horm Res 2001;55:305–308
              10.1159/000050018
              11805436
              © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

              Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

              Page count
              Figures: 2, References: 12, Pages: 4
              Categories
              Case Report

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