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      Stress–glucocorticoid–TSC22D3 axis compromises therapy-induced antitumor immunity

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          Most cited references 28

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          Essential role of BDNF in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway in social defeat stress.

          Mice experiencing repeated aggression develop a long-lasting aversion to social contact, which can be normalized by chronic, but not acute, administration of antidepressant. Using viral-mediated, mesolimbic dopamine pathway-specific knockdown of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), we showed that BDNF is required for the development of this experience-dependent social aversion. Gene profiling in the nucleus accumbens indicates that local knockdown of BDNF obliterates most of the effects of repeated aggression on gene expression within this circuit, with similar effects being produced by chronic treatment with antidepressant. These results establish an essential role for BDNF in mediating long-term neural and behavioral plasticity in response to aversive social experiences.
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            Is Open Access

            SurvExpress: An Online Biomarker Validation Tool and Database for Cancer Gene Expression Data Using Survival Analysis

            Validation of multi-gene biomarkers for clinical outcomes is one of the most important issues for cancer prognosis. An important source of information for virtual validation is the high number of available cancer datasets. Nevertheless, assessing the prognostic performance of a gene expression signature along datasets is a difficult task for Biologists and Physicians and also time-consuming for Statisticians and Bioinformaticians. Therefore, to facilitate performance comparisons and validations of survival biomarkers for cancer outcomes, we developed SurvExpress, a cancer-wide gene expression database with clinical outcomes and a web-based tool that provides survival analysis and risk assessment of cancer datasets. The main input of SurvExpress is only the biomarker gene list. We generated a cancer database collecting more than 20,000 samples and 130 datasets with censored clinical information covering tumors over 20 tissues. We implemented a web interface to perform biomarker validation and comparisons in this database, where a multivariate survival analysis can be accomplished in about one minute. We show the utility and simplicity of SurvExpress in two biomarker applications for breast and lung cancer. Compared to other tools, SurvExpress is the largest, most versatile, and quickest free tool available. SurvExpress web can be accessed in http://bioinformatica.mty.itesm.mx/SurvExpress (a tutorial is included). The website was implemented in JSP, JavaScript, MySQL, and R.
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              Neurogenesis-dependent and -independent effects of fluoxetine in an animal model of anxiety/depression.

              Understanding the physiopathology of affective disorders and their treatment relies on the availability of experimental models that accurately mimic aspects of the disease. Here we describe a mouse model of an anxiety/depressive-like state induced by chronic corticosterone treatment. Furthermore, chronic antidepressant treatment reversed the behavioral dysfunctions and the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis induced by corticosterone treatment. In corticosterone-treated mice where hippocampal neurogenesis is abolished by X-irradiation, the efficacy of fluoxetine is blocked in some, but not all, behavioral paradigms, suggesting both neurogenesis-dependent and -independent mechanisms of antidepressant action. Finally, we identified a number of candidate genes, the expression of which is decreased by chronic corticosterone and normalized by chronic fluoxetine treatment selectively in the hypothalamus. Importantly, mice deficient in one of these genes, beta-arrestin 2, displayed a reduced response to fluoxetine in multiple tasks, suggesting that beta-arrestin signaling is necessary for the antidepressant effects of fluoxetine.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Medicine
                Nat Med
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1078-8956
                1546-170X
                September 2019
                September 9 2019
                September 2019
                : 25
                : 9
                : 1428-1441
                Article
                10.1038/s41591-019-0566-4
                © 2019

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