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      Clinical Analysis of Benign Eyelid and Conjunctival Tumors

      a , b

      Ophthalmologica

      S. Karger AG

      Benign conjunctival tumors, Benign eyelid tumors, Conjunctiva, Eyelid

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          Abstract

          Purpose: To assess the relative frequency and clinicopathologic characteristics of benign conjunctival tumors. Methods: A retrospective study of 80 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital with benign eyelid and conjunctival tumor between April 2000 and November 2002 was undertaken, and clinical records including age, sex and involved site of tumors and pathology slides of the patients were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Twenty-three males and 33 females presented with benign eyelid tumors and 12 males and 12 females with conjunctival tumors. Mean age was 42.3 and 29.7 years, respectively. The lower eyelid was involved in 27 (48.2%) of eyelid tumors and the medial conjunctiva in 14 (58.3%) of conjunctival tumors. The most frequent tumor was intradermal nevus (44.6%), seborrheic keratosis (16.1%) and compound nevus (10.7%) in eyelid tumors, and compound nevus (29.2%) and intradermal nevus (25.0%) in conjunctival tumors. Conclusion: This report will provides a basic analysis of benign eyelid and conjunctival tumors.

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          Most cited references 8

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          Pyogenic granuloma (lobular capillary hemangioma): a clinicopathologic study of 178 cases.

           J Mulliken,  K Wiss,  J Patrice (1991)
          Pyogenic granuloma (lobular capillary hemangioma) is a common acquired vascular lesion of the skin and mucous membranes in the pediatric age group. This is a retrospective analysis of 178 patients, 17 years of age and younger (mean age 6.7 yrs). Forty-two percent of the lesions occurred in the first five years of life; only 12% appeared in infants less than 1 year old. The male:female ratio was 3:2. Most patients (74.2%) had no history of trauma or predisposing dermatologic condition. The mean lesional size was 6.5 mm and the mean duration at diagnosis was 3.8 months. The granulomas were most commonly located in the head and neck area (62.4%), followed in order of decreasing frequency by trunk (19.7%), upper extremity (12.9%), and lower extremity (5.0%). The preponderance (88.2%) occurred on the skin, the remaining ones involved the mucous membranes of the oral cavity and conjunctivae. Histologic examination demonstrated normal numbers of mast cells, in contrast to increased mast cells characteristic of proliferative phase hemangiomas. Most lesions (n = 149) were treated by full-thickness skin excision and linear closure; there were no recurrences in this group. The recurrence rate in 23 lesions treated by shave (intradermal) excision and cautery or cautery alone was 43.5%.
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            A clinical review of 209 pilomatricomas.

            Pilomatricomas have a wide variety of clinical characteristics and are often misdiagnosed. This can result in extensive surgery for an essentially benign condition. The purpose of this study was to define the clinical and histologic spectrum of these tumors to aid diagnosis. Two hundred nine cases were analyzed retrospectively with regard to age at presentation, site, size, and physical appearance. Pilomatricomas appear at any age, with peak presentation bimodally in the first and sixth decade. Their most common site is the head and neck. Presentation is of a hard nodule, either deeply subcutaneous and invisible or superficial with possible erosion through the skin surface. This may lead to a false diagnosis of malignancy or of an epidermoid cyst. An association with myotonic dystrophy has been confirmed, as is the rare occurrence of malignant transformation. Careful clinical examination and a high index of suspicion results in an accurate diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and the avoidance of unnecessarily extensive surgery.
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              Human papillomavirus and human disease.

              Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with a spectrum of different diseases in humans, including common warts and genital warts. Of more serious concern is the connection between certain HPV types and some malignancies, particularly cervical and anal cancer. DNA from HPV-16 and HPV-18, two types frequently found in cervical cancer tissue, can immortalize cells in laboratory cultures, unlike DNA from HPV types associated with benign genital lesions. Although it is unclear how high-risk HPV types cause cancer, studies indicate that malignant transformation involves the viral E6 and E7 gene products, which may exert their effect by interfering with the cellular proteins that regulate cell growth. The vast majority of those infected do not develop malignancies, indicating that HPV infection alone is not enough to cause cancer. Cofactors such as cigarette smoking, may be required before neoplasia can occur. The potential seriousness of HPV infections is suggested by the observations that the number of genital HPV infections diagnosed is increasing and that cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women throughout the world.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                OPH
                Ophthalmologica
                10.1159/issn.0030-3755
                Ophthalmologica
                S. Karger AG
                0030-3755
                1423-0267
                2006
                December 2005
                21 December 2005
                : 220
                : 1
                : 43-51
                Affiliations
                Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyunggi, South Korea
                Article
                89274 Ophthalmologica 2006;220:43–51
                10.1159/000089274
                16374048
                © 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 12, Tables: 6, References: 17, Pages: 9
                Categories
                Original Paper

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