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      Identification of subtypes in subjects with mild-to-moderate airflow limitation and its clinical and socioeconomic implications

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          The purpose of this study was to identify subtypes in patients with mild-to-moderate airflow limitation and to appreciate their clinical and socioeconomic implications.

          Methods

          Subjects who were aged ≥20 years and had forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1) ≥60% predicted and FEV 1/forced vital capacity <0.7 were selected from the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2007–2012. The data were merged to the National Health Insurance reimbursement database during the same period. k-Means clustering was performed to explore subtypes. For clustering analysis, six key input variables – age, body mass index (BMI), FEV 1% predicted, the presence or absence of self-reported wheezing, smoking status, and pack-years of smoking – were selected.

          Results

          Among a total of 2,140 subjects, five groups were identified through k-means clustering, namely putative “near-normal (n=232),” “asthmatic (n=392),” “chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n=37),” “asthmatic-overlap (n=893),” and “COPD-overlap (n=586)” subtypes. Near-normal group showed the oldest mean age (72±7 years) and highest FEV 1 (102%±8% predicted), and asthmatic group was the youngest (46±9 years). COPD and COPD-overlap groups were male predominant and all current or ex-smokers. While asthmatic group had the lowest prescription rate despite the highest proportion of self-reported wheezing, COPD, asthmatic-overlap, and COPD-overlap groups showed high prescription rate of respiratory medicine. Although COPD group formed only 1.7% of total subjects, they showed the highest mean medical cost and health care utilization, comprising 5.3% of the total medical cost. When calculating a ratio of total medical expense to household income, the mean ratio was highest in the COPD group.

          Conclusion

          Clinical and epidemiological heterogeneities of subjects with mild-to-moderate airflow limitation and a different level of health care utilization by each subtype are shown. Identification of a subtype with high health care demand could be a priority for effective utilization of limited resources.

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          Most cited references 23

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          Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

          This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) 50% predicted. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 7: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians should prescribe continuous oxygen therapy in patients with COPD who have severe resting hypoxemia (Pao(2) ≤55 mm Hg or Spo(2) ≤88%) (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).
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            The European Community Respiratory Health Survey.

            The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) was planned to answer specific questions about the distribution of asthma and health care given for asthma in the European Community. Specifically, the survey is designed to estimate variations in the prevalence of asthma, asthma-like symptoms and airway responsiveness; to estimate variations in exposures to known or suspected risk factors for asthma, and assess to what extent these variations explain the variations in the prevalence of disease; and to estimate differences in the use of medication for asthma. The protocol provides specific instructions on the sampling strategy adopted by the survey teams, as well as providing instructions on the use of questionnaires, the tests for allergy, lung function measurements, tests of airway responsiveness, and blood and urine collection. The principal data collection sheets and questionnaires are provided in the appendices, together with information on coding and quality control. The protocol is published as a reference for those who wish to know more of the methods used in the study, and also to give other groups who wish to collect comparable data access to the detailed methodology.
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              Global and regional estimates of COPD prevalence: Systematic review and meta–analysis

              Background The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) across many world regions is high. We aim to estimate COPD prevalence and number of disease cases for the years 1990 and 2010 across world regions based on the best available evidence in publicly accessible scientific databases. Methods We conducted a systematic search of Medline, EMBASE and Global Health for original, population–based studies providing spirometry–based prevalence rates of COPD across the world from January 1990 to December 2014. Random effects meta–analysis was conducted on extracted crude prevalence rates of COPD, with overall summaries of the meta–estimates (and confidence intervals) reported separately for World Health Organization (WHO) regions, the World Bank's income categories and settings (urban and rural). We developed a meta–regression epidemiological model that we used to estimate the prevalence of COPD in people aged 30 years or more. Findings Our search returned 37 472 publications. A total of 123 studies based on a spirometry–defined prevalence were retained for the review. From the meta–regression epidemiological model, we estimated about 227.3 million COPD cases in the year 1990 among people aged 30 years or more, corresponding to a global prevalence of 10.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.3%–14.0%) in this age group. The number of COPD cases increased to 384 million in 2010, with a global prevalence of 11.7% (8.4%–15.0%). This increase of 68.9% was mainly driven by global demographic changes. Across WHO regions, the highest prevalence was estimated in the Americas (13.3% in 1990 and 15.2% in 2010), and the lowest in South East Asia (7.9% in 1990 and 9.7% in 2010). The percentage increase in COPD cases between 1990 and 2010 was the highest in the Eastern Mediterranean region (118.7%), followed by the African region (102.1%), while the European region recorded the lowest increase (22.5%). In 1990, we estimated about 120.9 million COPD cases among urban dwellers (prevalence of 13.2%) and 106.3 million cases among rural dwellers (prevalence of 8.8%). In 2010, there were more than 230 million COPD cases among urban dwellers (prevalence of 13.6%) and 153.7 million among rural dwellers (prevalence of 9.7%). The overall prevalence in men aged 30 years or more was 14.3% (95% CI 13.3%–15.3%) compared to 7.6% (95% CI 7.0%–8.2%) in women. Conclusions Our findings suggest a high and growing prevalence of COPD, both globally and regionally. There is a paucity of studies in Africa, South East Asia and the Eastern Mediterranean region. There is a need for governments, policy makers and international organizations to consider strengthening collaborations to address COPD globally.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2017
                12 April 2017
                : 12
                : 1135-1144
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, EwhaWomans University
                [2 ]Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul
                [3 ]Pharmaceutical Policy Evaluation Research Team, Research Institution, Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service
                [4 ]Big Data Division, Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, Wonju
                [5 ]Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University College of Medicine, Seoul
                [6 ]Department of Internal Medicine and Environmental Health Center, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon
                [7 ]Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital
                [8 ]Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul
                [9 ]Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Jin Hwa Lee, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, EwhaWomans University,1071 Anyangcheon-ro Yangcheon-gu, Seoul 07985, South Korea, Tel +82 2 2650 6007, Fax +82 2 2655 2076, Email jinhwalee@ 123456ewha.ac.kr
                Article
                copd-12-1135
                10.2147/COPD.S130140
                5396836
                © 2017 Lee et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Respiratory medicine

                phenotype, copd, asthma, overlap, health care utilization, cluster

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