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      Increased hepcidin levels in preeclampsia: a protective mechanism against iron overload mediated oxidative stress?

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          The ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) as a measure of "antioxidant power": the FRAP assay.

          A simple, automated test measuring the ferric reducing ability of plasma, the FRAP assay, is presented as a novel method for assessing "antioxidant power." Ferric to ferrous ion reduction at low pH causes a colored ferrous-tripyridyltriazine complex to form. FRAP values are obtained by comparing the absorbance change at 593 nm in test reaction mixtures with those containing ferrous ions in known concentration. Absorbance changes are linear over a wide concentration range with antioxidant mixtures, including plasma, and with solutions containing one antioxidant in purified form. There is no apparent interaction between antioxidants. Measured stoichiometric factors of Trolox, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and uric acid are all 2.0; that of bilirubin is 4.0. Activity of albumin is very low. Within- and between-run CVs are <1.0 and <3.0%, respectively, at 100-1000 micromol/liter. FRAP values of fresh plasma of healthy Chinese adults: 612-1634 micromol/liter (mean, 1017; SD, 206; n = 141). The FRAP assay is inexpensive, reagents are simple to prepare, results are highly reproducible, and the procedure is straightforward and speedy. The FRAP assay offers a putative index of antioxidant, or reducing, potential of biological fluids within the technological reach of every laboratory and researcher interested in oxidative stress and its effects.
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            Hepcidin and iron homeostasis.

            Despite fluctuations in dietary iron intake and intermittent losses through bleeding, the plasma iron concentrations in humans remain stable at 10-30 μM. While most of the iron entering blood plasma comes from recycling, appropriate amount of iron is absorbed from the diet to compensate for losses and maintain nontoxic amounts in stores. Plasma iron concentration and iron distribution are similarly regulated in laboratory rodents. The hepatic peptide hepcidin was identified as the systemic iron-regulatory hormone. In the efferent arc, hepcidin regulates intestinal iron absorption, plasma iron concentrations, and tissue iron distribution by inducing degradation of its receptor, the cellular iron exporter ferroportin. Ferroportin exports iron into plasma from absorptive enterocytes, from macrophages that recycle the iron of senescent erythrocytes, and from hepatocytes that store iron. In the more complex and less well understood afferent arc, hepatic hepcidin synthesis is transcriptionally regulated by extracellular and intracellular iron concentrations through a molecular complex of bone morphogenetic protein receptors and their iron-specific ligands, modulators and iron sensors. Through as yet undefined pathways, hepcidin is also homeostatically regulated by the iron requirements of erythroid precursors for hemoglobin synthesis. In accordance with the role of hepcidin-mediated iron redistribution in host defense, hepcidin production is regulated by inflammation as well. Increased hepcidin concentrations in plasma are pathogenic in iron-restrictive anemias including anemias associated with inflammation, chronic kidney disease and some cancers. Hepcidin deficiency causes iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis and ineffective erythropoiesis. Hepcidin, ferroportin and their regulators represent potential targets for the diagnosis and treatment of iron disorders and anemias. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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              Hepcidin Mitigates Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Modulating Systemic Iron Homeostasis.

              Iron-mediated oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Hepcidin is an endogenous acute phase hepatic hormone that prevents iron export from cells by inducing degradation of the only known iron export protein, ferroportin. In this study, we used a mouse model to investigate the effect of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury on systemic iron homeostasis and determine if dynamic modulation of iron homeostasis with hepcidin has therapeutic benefit in the treatment of AKI. Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury induced hepatosplenic iron export through increased ferroportin expression, which resulted in hepatosplenic iron depletion and an increase in serum and kidney nonheme iron levels. Exogenous hepcidin treatment prevented renal ischemia-reperfusion-induced changes in iron homeostasis. Hepcidin also decreased kidney ferroportin expression and increased the expression of cytoprotective H-ferritin. Hepcidin-induced restoration of iron homeostasis was accompanied by a significant reduction in ischemia-reperfusion-induced tubular injury, apoptosis, renal oxidative stress, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Hepcidin -: deficient mice demonstrated increased susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury compared with wild-type mice. Reconstituting hepcidin-deficient mice with exogenous hepcidin induced hepatic iron sequestration, attenuated the reduction in renal H-ferritin and reduced renal oxidative stress, apoptosis, inflammation, and tubular injury. Hepcidin-mediated protection was associated with reduced serum IL-6 levels. In summary, renal ischemia-reperfusion injury results in profound alterations in systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin treatment restores iron homeostasis and reduces inflammation to mediate protection in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that hepcidin-ferroportin pathway holds promise as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of AKI.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
                The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
                Informa UK Limited
                1476-7058
                1476-4954
                February 16 2022
                February 20 2020
                February 16 2022
                : 35
                : 4
                : 636-641
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Biochemistry, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, India
                [2 ]Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, India
                [3 ]Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, India
                Article
                10.1080/14767058.2020.1730322
                32079434
                a59ca65d-b2c0-48c4-a49c-b233933bc5fb
                © 2022
                History

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