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      100 mW deep-ultraviolet emission from aluminium-nitride-based quantum wells pumped by an electron beam

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      Nature Photonics

      Springer Nature

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          Most cited references 20

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          An aluminium nitride light-emitting diode with a wavelength of 210 nanometres.

          Compact high-efficiency ultraviolet solid-state light sources--such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes--are of considerable technological interest as alternatives to large, toxic, low-efficiency gas lasers and mercury lamps. Microelectronic fabrication technologies and the environmental sciences both require light sources with shorter emission wavelengths: the former for improved resolution in photolithography and the latter for sensors that can detect minute hazardous particles. In addition, ultraviolet solid-state light sources are also attracting attention for potential applications in high-density optical data storage, biomedical research, water and air purification, and sterilization. Wide-bandgap materials, such as diamond and III-V nitride semiconductors (GaN, AlGaN and AlN; refs 3-10), are potential materials for ultraviolet LEDs and laser diodes, but suffer from difficulties in controlling electrical conduction. Here we report the successful control of both n-type and p-type doping in aluminium nitride (AlN), which has a very wide direct bandgap of 6 eV. This doping strategy allows us to develop an AlN PIN (p-type/intrinsic/n-type) homojunction LED with an emission wavelength of 210 nm, which is the shortest reported to date for any kind of LED. The emission is attributed to an exciton transition, and represents an important step towards achieving exciton-related light-emitting devices as well as replacing gas light sources with solid-state light sources.
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            CASINO V2.42: a fast and easy-to-use modeling tool for scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis users.

            Monte Carlo simulations have been widely used by microscopists for the last few decades. In the beginning it was a tedious and slow process, requiring a high level of computer skills from users and long computational times. Recent progress in the microelectronics industry now provides researchers with affordable desktop computers with clock rates greater than 3 GHz. With this type of computing power routinely available, Monte Carlo simulation is no longer an exclusive or long (overnight) process. The aim of this paper is to present a new user-friendly simulation program based on the earlier CASINO Monte Carlo program. The intent of this software is to assist scanning electron microscope users in interpretation of imaging and microanalysis and also with more advanced procedures including electron-beam lithography. This version uses a new architecture that provides results twice as quickly. This program is freely available to the scientific community and can be downloaded from the website: (www.gel.usherb.ca/casino).
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              Luminescence studies of optically pumped quantum wells in GaAs-\({\mathrm{Al}}_{x}{\mathrm{Ga}}_{1-x}\mathrm{As}\)multilayer structures

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Photonics
                Nature Photon
                Springer Nature
                1749-4885
                1749-4893
                September 26 2010
                September 26 2010
                : 4
                : 11
                : 767-770
                10.1038/nphoton.2010.220
                © 2010

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