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      Can we Introduce Mindfulness Practice through Digital Design?

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 1 , 1

      The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      12 - 14 September 2012

      Mental Wellbeing, Mindfulness, DBT, BPD, Emotional Design, Interaction Design, User Experience

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          Abstract

          We follow a person-centred, collaborative approach in the development of a set of innovative, interactive artefacts: the Spheres of Wellbeing, designed specifically for women with a dual diagnosis of learning disability and borderline personality disorder, who are living in a medium secure unit of a UK hospital. The women present a very vulnerable and difficult to treat client group due to their extremely challenging behaviours, complex needs and a persistent lack of motivation to engage in therapy. Simultaneously, they have a strong need for attention, care and positively experienced interactions. The paper presents the design and rationale of one of the Spheres: the Heartbeat Sphere, which is intended to encourage the women to practice mindfulness. Mindfulness practice is a vital component of Dialectical Behavioural Therapy; a specialist psychosocial treatment for their condition. Interactions with the Heartbeat Sphere are envisioned to complement their mindfulness skills practice and to enhance their mental wellbeing.

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          Most cited references 9

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          Borderline personality disorder.

          Borderline personality disorder is characterised by a pervasive pattern of instability in affect regulation, impulse control, interpersonal relationships, and self-image. Clinical signs of the disorder include emotional dysregulation, impulsive aggression, repeated self-injury, and chronic suicidal tendencies, which make these patients frequent users of mental-health resources. Causal factors are only partly known, but genetic factors and adverse events during childhood, such as physical and sexual abuse, contribute to the development of the disorder. Dialectical behaviour therapy and psychodynamic partial hospital programmes are effective treatments for out-of-control patients, and drug therapy can reduce depression, anxiety, and impulsive aggression. More research is needed for the understanding and management of this disabling clinical condition. Current strategies are focusing on the neurobiological underpinnings of the disorder and the development and dissemination of better and more cost-effective treatments to clinicians.
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            Naturalistic evaluation of dialectical behavior therapy-oriented treatment for borderline personality disorder

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              AFFECT REGULATION IN WOMEN WITH BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER TRAITS

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2012
                September 2012
                : 1-4
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ]Newcastle University
                [ 2 ]Northumbria

                University
                [ 3 ]Calderstones Partnership

                NHS Foundation Trust
                [ 4 ]Microsoft Research

                Cambridge
                [ 5 ]University College

                Cork
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2012.81
                © Anja Thieme et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Birmingham, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                26
                Birmingham, UK
                12 - 14 September 2012
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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