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      Carbonic anhydrase IX-directed immunoliposomes for targeted drug delivery to human lung cancer cells in vitro

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          Abstract

          Targeted drug delivery to cancer cells by use of antibody-conjugated liposomes (immunoliposomes) has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Despite increasing efforts in developing immunoliposomes as drug carriers, the investigation of useful tumor-associated antigen targets is far from complete. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a cell surface antigen characterized by hypoxia-induced expression in many solid tumors. This study investigated the feasibility of CA IX-directed immunoliposomes for targeted delivery of docetaxel to human lung cancer cells in vitro. Docetaxel-loaded immunoliposomes targeting CA IX were developed with an encapsulation efficiency of 84.4±3.9% and an average particle size of 143.9±11.1 nm. Using fluorescence-based flow cytometry, the in vitro binding activity of the immunoliposomes was found to be significantly higher (by 1.65-fold) than that of the nontargeted liposomes in CA IX-positive lung cancer cells, whereas no such difference was observed between the two groups when CA IX was not expressed. Furthermore, immunoliposomal docetaxel exhibited the strongest growth inhibitory effect against CA IX-positive lung cancer cells when compared with nontargeted liposomal docetaxel or free docetaxel solution. These data suggested that CA IX-directed immunoliposomes could serve as a promising drug delivery system for targeted killing of lung cancer cells.

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          Most cited references 38

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          Hypoxia-inducible expression of tumor-associated carbonic anhydrases.

          The transcriptional complex hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) has emerged as an important mediator of gene expression patterns in tumors, although the range of responding genes is still incompletely defined. Here we show that the tumor-associated carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are tightly regulated by this system. Both CA9 and CA12 were strongly induced by hypoxia in a range of tumor cell lines. In renal carcinoma cells that are defective for the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor, up-regulation of these CAs is associated with loss of regulation by hypoxia, consistent with the critical function of pVHL in the regulation of HIF-1. Further studies of CA9 defined a HIF-1-dependent hypoxia response element in the minimal promoter and demonstrated that tight regulation by the HIF/pVHL system was reflected in the pattern of CA IX expression within tumors. Generalized up-regulation of CA IX in VHL-associated renal cell carcinoma contrasted with focal perinecrotic expression in a variety of non-VHL-associated tumors. In comparison with vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, expression of CA IX demonstrated a similar, although more tightly circumscribed, pattern of expression around regions of necrosis and showed substantial although incomplete overlap with activation of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. These studies define a new class of HIF-1-responsive gene, the activation of which has implications for the understanding of hypoxic tumor metabolism and which may provide endogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.
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            Stealth liposomes: review of the basic science, rationale, and clinical applications, existing and potential

            Among several promising new drug-delivery systems, liposomes represent an advanced technology to deliver active molecules to the site of action, and at present several formulations are in clinical use. Research on liposome technology has progressed from conventional vesicles (“first-generation liposomes”) to “second-generation liposomes”, in which long-circulating liposomes are obtained by modulating the lipid composition, size, and charge of the vesicle. Liposomes with modified surfaces have also been developed using several molecules, such as glycolipids or sialic acid. A significant step in the development of long-circulating liposomes came with inclusion of the synthetic polymer poly-(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in liposome composition. The presence of PEG on the surface of the liposomal carrier has been shown to extend blood-circulation time while reducing mononuclear phagocyte system uptake (stealth liposomes). This technology has resulted in a large number of liposome formulations encapsulating active molecules, with high target efficiency and activity. Further, by synthetic modification of the terminal PEG molecule, stealth liposomes can be actively targeted with monoclonal antibodies or ligands. This review focuses on stealth technology and summarizes pre-clinical and clinical data relating to the principal liposome formulations; it also discusses emerging trends of this promising technology.
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              Prognostic significance of a novel hypoxia-regulated marker, carbonic anhydrase IX, in invasive breast carcinoma.

              To assess the frequency of expression and the prognostic significance of a hypoxia-regulated marker, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), in a cohort of patients with invasive breast cancer. CA IX expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry with a murine monoclonal antibody, M75, in a series of 103 women treated surgically for invasive breast cancer. The majority of patients were treated with adjuvant hormonal or chemotherapy. The frequency of CA IX expression, its association with recognized prognostic factors, and the relationship with outcome was evaluated by univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. CA IX expression was present in 49 (48%) of 103 cases. The level of CA IX expression was found to be significantly associated with tumor necrosis (P <.001), higher grade (P =.02), and negative estrogen receptor status (P <.001). Furthermore, CA IX expression was associated with a higher relapse rate (P =.004) and a worse overall survival (P =.001). By multivariate analysis, CA IX was also shown to be an independent predictive factor for overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 6.75, P =.05). CA IX expression was associated with worse relapse-free survival and overall survival in an unselected cohort of patients with invasive breast carcinoma. The potential role of CA IX as a marker of hypoxia within breast carcinomas was also indicated by a significant association with necrosis. Further work assessing its prognostic significance in breast cancer is warranted, particularly interactions with radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2014
                22 July 2014
                : 8
                : 993-1001
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
                [2 ]Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Zhijun Yang, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, 7 Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Tel +852 3411 2961, Fax +852 3411 2461, Email yzhijun@ 123456hkbu.edu.hk
                Aiping Lu, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, 7 Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Tel +852 3411 2456, Fax +852 3411 2461, Email aipinglu@ 123456hkbu.edu.hk
                Article
                dddt-8-993
                10.2147/DDDT.S63235
                4113570
                © 2014 Wong et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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