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      Individual Differences in the Communication of Romantic Interest: Development of the Flirting Styles Inventory

      , , ,
      Communication Quarterly
      Informa UK Limited

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          Gender differences in sexuality: a meta-analysis.

          This meta-analysis surveyed 177 usable sources that reported data on gender differences on 21 different measures of sexual attitudes and behaviors. The largest gender difference was in incidence of masturbation: Men had the greater incidence (d = .96). There was also a large gender difference in attitudes toward casual sex: Males had considerably more permissive attitudes (d = .81). There were no gender differences in attitudes toward homosexuality or in sexual satisfaction. Most other gender differences were in the small-to-moderate range. Gender differences narrowed from the 1960s to the 1980s for many variables. Chodorow's neoanalytic theory, sociobiology, social learning theory, social role theory, and script theory are discussed in relation to these findings.
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            On the nature of self-monitoring: matters of assessment, matters of validity.

            An extensive network of empirical relations has been identified in research on the psychological construct of self-monitoring. Nevertheless, in recent years some concerns have been expressed about the instrument used for the assessment of self-monitoring propensities, the Self-Monitoring Scale. Both the extent to which the measure taps an interpretable and meaningful causal variable and the extent to which the self-monitoring construct provides an appropriate theoretical understanding of this causal variable have been questioned. An examination of reanalyses of studies of self-monitoring, analyses of the internal structure of the Self-Monitoring Scale, and further relevant data suggest that the measure does tap a meaningful and interpretable causal variable with pervasive influences on social behavior, a variable reflected as a general self-monitoring factor. We discuss the evaluation and furthering of the interpretation of this latent causal variable, offer criteria for evaluating alternative measures of self-monitoring, and present a new, 18-item Self-Monitoring Scale.
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              A theory and method of love.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Communication Quarterly
                Communication Quarterly
                Informa UK Limited
                0146-3373
                1746-4102
                November 29 2010
                November 29 2010
                : 58
                : 4
                : 365-393
                Article
                10.1080/01463373.2010.524874
                a602de63-c8e7-44b6-be77-f3446ad26dc1
                © 2010
                History

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