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      Peritoneal Dialysis Zoonotic Bacterial Peritonitis with Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

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          Abstract

          We present the first reported case of peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, an organism that had been misclassified as S. aureus in the past. S. pseudintermedius is well recognized in the veterinary literature and noted as flora in the mouth, nares, and anus of domesticated animals. It has been associated with soft tissue infections in pets and is now being reported in increased frequency as the causative agent in various human infections. It also has a different antibiotic sensitivity profile. The patient had close contact with her pet dog and was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics in the hospital followed by oral doxycycline for 10 days after discharge. The patient has not had any recurrent infection after obtaining and applying appropriate hygienic education and precautions.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Review on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

          Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is an important opportunistic pathogen of companion animals, especially dogs. Since 2006 there has been a significant emergence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) mainly due to clonal spread. This article reviews research on MRSP with a focus on occurrence, methods used for identification, risk factors for colonization and infection, zoonotic potential and control options. Potential areas for future research are also discussed.
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            ISPD position statement on reducing the risks of peritoneal dialysis-related infections.

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              Public health risk of antimicrobial resistance transfer from companion animals.

              Antimicrobials are important tools for the therapy of infectious bacterial diseases in companion animals. Loss of efficacy of antimicrobial substances can seriously compromise animal health and welfare. A need for the development of new antimicrobials for the therapy of multiresistant infections, particularly those caused by Gram-negative bacteria, has been acknowledged in human medicine and a future corresponding need in veterinary medicine is expected. A unique aspect related to antimicrobial resistance and risk of resistance transfer in companion animals is their close contact with humans. This creates opportunities for interspecies transmission of resistant bacteria. Yet, the current knowledge of this field is limited and no risk assessment is performed when approving new veterinary antimicrobials. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the use and indications for antimicrobials in companion animals, drug-resistant bacteria of concern among companion animals, risk factors for colonization of companion animals with resistant bacteria and transmission of antimicrobial resistance (bacteria and/or resistance determinants) between animals and humans. The major antimicrobial resistance microbiological hazards originating from companion animals that directly or indirectly may cause adverse health effects in humans are MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, VRE, ESBL- or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Gram-negative bacteria. In the face of the previously recognized microbiological hazards, a risk assessment tool could be applied in applications for marketing authorization for medicinal products for companion animals. This would allow the approval of new veterinary medicinal antimicrobials for which risk levels are estimated as acceptable for public health.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CND
                CND
                10.1159/issn.2296-9705
                Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis
                S. Karger AG
                2296-9705
                2020
                May – August 2020
                12 June 2020
                : 10
                : 2
                : 65-70
                Affiliations
                aGeneral Internal Medicine, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio, USA
                bDepartment of Nursing, ProMedica Toledo Hospital, Toledo, Ohio, USA
                Author notes
                *Basil Akpunonu, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Toledo Medical Center, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Mail Stop 1186, Toledo, OH 43614 (USA), basil.akpunonu@utoledo.edu
                Article
                508126 PMC7383182 Case Rep Nephrol Dial 2020;10:65–70
                10.1159/000508126
                PMC7383182
                32775342
                © 2020 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel

                This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC). Usage and distribution for commercial purposes requires written permission. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Pages: 6
                Categories
                Case Report

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