23
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and generalised anxiety disorder

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references360

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI)

          This paper presents an overview of the World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and a discussion of the methodological research on which the development of the instrument was based. The WMH‐CIDI includes a screening module and 40 sections that focus on diagnoses (22 sections), functioning (four sections), treatment (two sections), risk factors (four sections), socio‐demographic correlates (seven sections), and methodological factors (two sections). Innovations compared to earlier versions of the CIDI include expansion of the diagnostic sections, a focus on 12‐month as well as lifetime disorders in the same interview, detailed assessment of clinical severity, and inclusion of information on treatment, risk factors, and consequences. A computer‐assisted version of the interview is available along with a direct data entry software system that can be used to keypunch responses to the paper‐and‐pencil version of the interview. Computer programs that generate diagnoses are also available based on both ICD‐10 and DSM‐IV criteria. Elaborate CD‐ROM‐based training materials are available to teach interviewers how to administer the interview as well as to teach supervisors how to monitor the quality of data collection. Copyright © 2004 Whurr Publishers Ltd.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The Health Anxiety Inventory: development and validation of scales for the measurement of health anxiety and hypochondriasis.

            A self-rated measure of health anxiety should be sensitive across the full range of intensity (from mild concern to frank hypochondriasis) and should differentiate people suffering from health anxiety from those who have actual physical illness but who are not excessively concerned about their health. It should also encompass the full range of clinical symptoms characteristic of clinical hypochondriasis. The development and validation of such a scale is described. Three studies were conducted. First, the questionnaire was validated by comparing the responses of patients suffering from hypochondriasis with those suffering from hypochondriasis and panic disorder, panic disorder, social phobia and non-patient controls. Secondly, a state version of the questionnaire was administered to patients undergoing cognitive-behavioural treatment or wait-list in order to examine the measure's sensitivity to change. In the third study, a shortened version was developed and validated in similar types of sample, and in a range of samples of people seeking medical help for physical illness. The scale was found to be reliable and to have a high internal consistency. Hypochondriacal patients scored significantly higher than anxiety disorder patients, including both social phobic patients and panic disorder patients as well as normal controls. In the second study, a 'state' version of the scale was found to be sensitive to treatment effects, and to correlate very highly with a clinician rating based on an interview of present clinical state. A development and refinement of the scale (intended to reflect more fully the range of symptoms of and reactions to hypochondriasis) was found to be reliable and valid. A very short (14 item) version of the scale was found to have comparable properties to the full length scale. The HAI is a reliable and valid measure of health anxiety. It is likely to be useful as a brief screening instrument, as there is a short form which correlates highly with the longer version.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Development and validation of measures of social phobia scrutiny fear and social interaction anxiety11Editor’s note: This article was written before the development of some contemporary measures of social phobia, such as the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (Turner et al., 1989). We have invited this article for publication because of the growing interest in the scales described therein. S.T.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
                Aust N Z J Psychiatry
                SAGE Publications
                0004-8674
                1440-1614
                November 30 2018
                December 2018
                November 30 2018
                December 2018
                : 52
                : 12
                : 1109-1172
                Affiliations
                [1 ]RANZCP Clinical Practice Guidelines Team for Panic Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder and Generalised Anxiety Disorder, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
                [2 ]Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety and Depression, University of New South Wales School of Psychiatry, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, Australia
                [3 ]Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch, Christchurch, New Zealand
                [4 ]Discipline of Psychiatry, Westmead Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
                [5 ]Department of Psychological Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
                [6 ]Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia
                [7 ]Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia
                [8 ]School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia
                Article
                10.1177/0004867418799453
                a69fbac5-7769-4ed2-b7bd-a413105b5ab6
                © 2018

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article