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      Poetry as method – trying to see the world differently

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          Abstract

          Research with communities, even co-produced research with a commitment to social justice, can be limited by its expression in conventional disciplinary language and format. Vibrant, warm and sometimes complex encounters with community partners become contained through the gesture of representation. In this sense, 'writing up' can actually become a kind of slow violence towards participants, projects and ourselves. As a less conventional and containable form of expression, poetry offers an alternative to the power games of researching 'on' communities and writing it up. It is excessive in the sense that it goes beyond the cycles of reduction and representation, allowing the expression of subjective (and perhaps sometimes even contradictory) impressions from participants. In this cowritten paper we explore poetry as a social research method through subjective testimony and in the light of our Connected Communities-funded projects (Imagine, Threads of Time and Taking Yourself Seriously), where poetry as method came to the fore as a way of hearing and representing voices differently.

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          Journal
          72010652
          Research for All
          UCL IOE Press
          2399-8121
          01 February 2020
          : 4
          : 1
          : 87-101
          Article
          2399-8121(20200201)4:1L.87;1- s7.phd /ioep/rfa/2020/00000004/00000001/art00007
          10.18546/RFA.04.1.07
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          Research for All
          Volume 4, Issue 1

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