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      The influence of political ideology and trust on willingness to vaccinate

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      PLoS ONE
      Public Library of Science

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          Abstract

          In light of the increasing refusal of some parents to vaccinate children, public health strategies have focused on increasing knowledge and awareness based on a “knowledge-deficit” approach. However, decisions about vaccination are based on more than mere knowledge of risks, costs, and benefits. Individual decision making about vaccinating involves many other factors including those related to emotion, culture, religion, and socio-political context. In this paper, we use a nationally representative internet survey in the U.S. to investigate socio-political characteristics to assess attitudes about vaccination. In particular, we consider how political ideology and trust affect opinions about vaccinations for flu, pertussis, and measles. Our findings demonstrate that ideology has a direct effect on vaccine attitudes. In particular, conservative respondents are less likely to express pro-vaccination beliefs than other individuals. Furthermore, ideology also has an indirect effect on immunization propensity. The ideology variable predicts an indicator capturing trust in government medical experts, which in turn helps to explain individual-level variation with regards to attitudes about vaccine choice.

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          Most cited references66

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          Cutoff criteria for fit indexes in covariance structure analysis: Conventional criteria versus new alternatives

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            Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases.

            This article described three heuristics that are employed in making judgements under uncertainty: (i) representativeness, which is usually employed when people are asked to judge the probability that an object or event A belongs to class or process B; (ii) availability of instances or scenarios, which is often employed when people are asked to assess the frequency of a class or the plausibility of a particular development; and (iii) adjustment from an anchor, which is usually employed in numerical prediction when a relevant value is available. These heuristics are highly economical and usually effective, but they lead to systematic and predictable errors. A better understanding of these heuristics and of the biases to which they lead could improve judgements and decisions in situations of uncertainty.
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              Perception of risk

              P Slovic (1987)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: ResourcesRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: ResourcesRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: VisualizationRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                25 January 2018
                2018
                : 13
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [001]Department of Politics and Philosophy, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, United States of America
                Fordham University, UNITED STATES
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-17-32930
                10.1371/journal.pone.0191728
                5784985
                29370265
                a6cb0dd1-f235-4786-84f9-07b6185c91a2
                © 2018 Baumgaertner et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 3, Pages: 13
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000002, National Institutes of Health;
                Award ID: P20GM104420
                Award Recipient :
                This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, P20GM104420 to BB. The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Immunology
                Vaccination and Immunization
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Immunology
                Vaccination and Immunization
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Public and Occupational Health
                Preventive Medicine
                Vaccination and Immunization
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Infectious Diseases
                Infectious Disease Control
                Vaccines
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Health Care
                Health Care Providers
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Infectious Diseases
                Bacterial Diseases
                Pertussis
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Infectious Diseases
                Viral Diseases
                Measles
                Social Sciences
                Political Science
                Governments
                Political Parties
                Medicine and health sciences
                Infectious diseases
                Infectious disease control
                Vaccines
                Viral vaccines
                MMR vaccine
                Biology and life sciences
                Microbiology
                Virology
                Viral vaccines
                MMR vaccine
                Social Sciences
                Sociology
                Culture
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized
                Uncategorized

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