22
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Osmia species (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae) from the southeastern United States with modified facial hairs: taxonomy, host plants, and conservation status

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Abstract

          We describe females and males of Osmia (Melanosmia) calaminthae sp. n., an apparent floral specialist on Calamintha ashei ( Lamiaceae), and provide observations on the behavior of female bees on flowers of this plant. We also provide diagnostic information for Osmia (Diceratosmia) conjunctoides Robertson, stat. n., and synonymize Osmia (Diceratosmia) subfasciata miamiensis Mitchell with Osmia conjunctoides syn. n. Females of both Osmia calaminthae and Osmia conjunctoides are unique among North American Osmia for having short, erect, simple facial hairs, which are apparent adaptations for collecting pollen from nototribic flowers. Osmia calaminthae is currently only known from sandy scrub at four nearby sites in the southern Lake Wales Ridge in Highlands County, Florida, USA, while Osmia conjunctoides is known from limited but widespread sites in the southeastern USA. We discuss the conservation status of both species based on known or speculated floral associates and distributions.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 10

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata: the world's most intensively managed solitary bee.

          The alfalfa leafcutting bee (ALCB), Megachile rotundata F. (Megachildae), was accidentally introduced into the United States by the 1940s. Nest management of this Eurasian nonsocial pollinator transformed the alfalfa seed industry in North America, tripling seed production. The most common ALCB management practice is the loose cell system, in which cocooned bees are removed from nesting cavities for cleaning and storage. Traits of ALCBs that favored their commercialization include gregarious nesting; use of leaves for lining nests; ready acceptance of affordable, mass-produced nesting materials; alfalfa pollination efficacy; and emergence synchrony with alfalfa bloom. The ALCB became a commercial success because much of its natural history was understood, targeted research was pursued, and producer ingenuity was encouraged. The ALCB presents a model system for commercializing other solitary bees and for advancing new testable hypotheses in diverse biological disciplines.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Convergent evolution of morphological specializations in Central European bee and honey wasp species as an adaptation to the uptake of pollen from nototribic flowers (Hymenoptera, Apoidea and Masaridae)

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Some Demographic Characteristics of the Florida Rosemary Ceratiola ericoides Michx

               Ann Johnson (1982)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                URI : urn:lsid:zoobank.org:author:90A04B61-0B07-4F3F-8F9E-DDCBDC108314
                URI : urn:lsid:zoobank.org:author:98A484A3-EBC4-490E-BA1D-658BA45BBD84
                URI : urn:lsid:zoobank.org:author:AD099E58-A69A-4C05-8E8E-2CC367FF3CA0
                URI : urn:lsid:zoobank.org:author:80DCC2BA-6D2D-449B-83DA-08BB71DBE589
                Journal
                Zookeys
                ZooKeys
                ZooKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2989
                1313-2970
                2011
                21 November 2011
                : 148
                : 257-278
                Affiliations
                [1 ]USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory, BNR 244 UMC 5310, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-5310
                [2 ]Archbold Biological Station, P.O. Box 2057, Lake Placid, FL 33862
                [3 ]American Museum of Natural History, Division of Invertebrate Zoology, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Molly G. Rightmyer ( molly_rightmyer@ 123456yahoo.com )

                Academic editor: Michael Engel 

                Article
                10.3897/zookeys.148.1497
                3264411
                22287900
                Molly G. Rightmyer, Mark Deyrup, John S. Ascher, Terry Griswold

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Product
                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article