Blog
About

99
views
1
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    3
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      What should services for people with autism look like?

      Advances in Autism

      Emerald Publishing

      Autism, Services, Adults, Autism spectrum condition, Quality of life, Person-centred approaches

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose

          – The purpose of this paper is to examine the key components and approaches which contribute to good autism services.

          Design/methodology/approach

          – This paper reviews some of the literature around quality of life in autism services and describes the approach taken by The National Autistic Society.

          Findings

          – There is minimal research to enable service providers to shape their services according to what is most important for people with autism. The SPELL framework used by The National Autistic Society provides an approach which can be adapted to individual needs. Good autism services need to be based on a sound and practical understanding of autism.

          Practical implications

          – People on the autism spectrum should be involved in determining what outcomes are most important to them, and services should then be based around those needs. Services therefore need to be individualised and person centred, underpinned by an in-depth knowledge and understanding of autism.

          Originality/value

          – This review highlights the importance of people being involved in determining what is important to them and how services which support them should be shaped and delivered.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 8

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Young adult outcome of autism spectrum disorders.

          To learn about the lives of young adults with ASD, families with children born 1974-1984, diagnosed as preschoolers and followed into adolescence were contacted by mail. Of 76 eligible, 48 (63%) participated in a telephone interview. Global outcome scores were assigned based on work, friendships and independence. At mean age 24, half had good to fair outcome and 46% poor. Co-morbid conditions, obesity and medication use were common. Families noted unmet needs particularly in social areas. Multilinear regression indicated a combination of IQ and CARS score at age 11 predicted outcome. Earlier studies reported more adults with ASD who had poor to very poor outcomes, however current young people had more opportunities, and thus better results were expected.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            On the ontological status of autism: the ‘double empathy problem’

             Damian Milton (2012)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Transition From School to Adulthood for Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorders

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                AIA
                10.1108/AIA
                Advances in Autism
                Emerald Publishing
                2056-3868
                30 July 2015
                30 July 2015
                : 1
                : 1
                : 41-46
                Affiliations
                The National Autistic Society, The Centre for Autism, London, United Kingdom.
                Article
                AIA-05-2015-0005.pdf
                10.1108/AIA-05-2015-0005
                © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
                Product
                Categories
                Articles
                Viewpoint
                Health & social care
                Learning & intellectual disabilities
                Custom metadata
                yes
                yes
                JOURNAL
                included

                Comments

                Comment on this article