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      A meta-analysis of associations between weight bias internalization and conceptually-related correlates: A step towards improving construct validity

      , , , , ,
      Clinical Psychology Review
      Elsevier BV

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          A power primer.

          One possible reason for the continued neglect of statistical power analysis in research in the behavioral sciences is the inaccessibility of or difficulty with the standard material. A convenient, although not comprehensive, presentation of required sample sizes is provided here. Effect-size indexes and conventional values for these are given for operationally defined small, medium, and large effects. The sample sizes necessary for .80 power to detect effects at these levels are tabled for eight standard statistical tests: (a) the difference between independent means, (b) the significance of a product-moment correlation, (c) the difference between independent rs, (d) the sign test, (e) the difference between independent proportions, (f) chi-square tests for goodness of fit and contingency tables, (g) one-way analysis of variance, and (h) the significance of a multiple or multiple partial correlation.
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            Assessing heterogeneity in meta-analysis: Q statistic or I2 index?

            In meta-analysis, the usual way of assessing whether a set of single studies is homogeneous is by means of the Q test. However, the Q test only informs meta-analysts about the presence versus the absence of heterogeneity, but it does not report on the extent of such heterogeneity. Recently, the I(2) index has been proposed to quantify the degree of heterogeneity in a meta-analysis. In this article, the performances of the Q test and the confidence interval around the I(2) index are compared by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. The results show the utility of the I(2) index as a complement to the Q test, although it has the same problems of power with a small number of studies.
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              A Modified Labeling Theory Approach to Mental Disorders: An Empirical Assessment

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Psychology Review
                Clinical Psychology Review
                Elsevier BV
                02727358
                March 2022
                March 2022
                : 92
                : 102127
                Article
                10.1016/j.cpr.2022.102127
                35074712
                a8031d37-3a2f-4db4-8b1a-06a28da02348
                © 2022

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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