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      Drivers of Human Stress on the Environment in the Twenty-First Century

      1 , 2
      Annual Review of Environment and Resources
      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          Human actions are transforming ecosystems across the globe. Six frameworks aid in understanding the forces that drive human stress on the environment and human responses to this stress. Two of them, the stochastic impacts by regression on population, affluence and technology (STIRPAT) model and decomposition analysis, are approaches to analyzing data. Four describe the interrelated system of human actions and environmental responses: driving forces, pressures, states, impacts, responses (DPSIR); the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) framework; coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) and telecoupling; and social-ecological systems (SES). In applying these frameworks, attention must be given to the scale of analysis and to the effects of context. In addition to the frameworks there are four substantial research literatures providing theory and empirical analysis of how drivers place stress on the environment: a macrocomparative tradition, work on household energy consumption, land change science, and research on commons. Although these traditions remain somewhat separate, they are largely complementary.

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          Most cited references156

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          The theory of planned behavior

          Icek Ajzen (1991)
          Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), 179-211
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            A general framework for analyzing sustainability of social-ecological systems.

            A major problem worldwide is the potential loss of fisheries, forests, and water resources. Understanding of the processes that lead to improvements in or deterioration of natural resources is limited, because scientific disciplines use different concepts and languages to describe and explain complex social-ecological systems (SESs). Without a common framework to organize findings, isolated knowledge does not cumulate. Until recently, accepted theory has assumed that resource users will never self-organize to maintain their resources and that governments must impose solutions. Research in multiple disciplines, however, has found that some government policies accelerate resource destruction, whereas some resource users have invested their time and energy to achieve sustainability. A general framework is used to identify 10 subsystem variables that affect the likelihood of self-organization in efforts to achieve a sustainable SES.
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              From Intentions to Actions: A Theory of Planned Behavior

              Icek Ajzen (1985)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Environment and Resources
                Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour.
                Annual Reviews
                1543-5938
                1545-2050
                October 17 2017
                October 17 2017
                : 42
                : 1
                : 189-213
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Sociology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824;
                [2 ]Environmental Science and Policy Program, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-environ-110615-085440
                a889f178-733f-47f6-8744-5377f896ccf8
                © 2017
                History

                Sociology,Social policy & Welfare,Earth & Environmental sciences,Urban studies,Geosciences,Anthropology

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