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      Validity and reliability of the Setswana translation of the Short Form-8 health-related quality of life health survey in adults

      1 , , 1 , 2 , 1 , 2 , 3

      Health SA = SA Gesondheid

      AOSIS

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          Abstract

          Background

          The absence of culturally relevant measures in indigenous languages could pose a challenge to epidemiological studies on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in developing nations.

          Aim

          To explore the feasibility and determine the validity and reliability of the Setswana translation of the HRQoL Short Form-8 (SF-8) among Setswana-speaking adults.

          Setting

          Potchefstroom in the North West province.

          Methods

          Sixty healthy men ( n = 26) and women ( n = 34), aged 45.5 ± 9.3 years, completed a Setswana translation of the SF-8 questionnaire and the original English version twice, with a 4-week interval between completions.

          Results

          The Setswana SF-8 presented good concurrent validity with the Spearman’s correlation coefficients ( ρ) of 0.72 for role physical to 0.91 for social functioning. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for the first and second measurements were 0.87 and 0.87, respectively, for the Setswana-translated SF-8 and 0.86 and 0.89 for the original English SF-8. The reliability coefficients were moderate for the mental health ( ρ = 0.60), social functioning ( ρ = 0.56) and role emotional ( ρ = 0.50) domains, as well as the mental component summary ( ρ = 0.50) and physical component summary ( ρ = 0.45), but fair for the role physical ( ρ = 0.43), body pain ( ρ = 0.43), general health ( ρ = 0.42), physical functioning ( ρ = 0.41) and vitality ( ρ = 0.38) domains on the translated Setswana version of the SF-8.

          Conclusion

          The Setswana SF-8 version was feasible, acceptable and had acceptable concurrent validity and fair to moderate evidence of test–retest reliability for assessing HRQoL among adult Setswana-speaking community dwellers.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 10

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          The short international physical activity questionnaire: cross-cultural adaptation, validation and reliability of the Hausa language version in Nigeria

          Background Accurate assessment of physical activity is important in determining the risk for chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, cancer and obesity. The absence of culturally relevant measures in indigenous languages could pose challenges to epidemiological studies on physical activity in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Short International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-SF) to the Hausa language, and to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Hausa version of IPAQ-SF in Nigeria. Methods The English IPAQ-SF was translated into the Hausa language, synthesized, back translated, and subsequently subjected to expert committee review and pre-testing. The final product (Hausa IPAQ-SF) was tested in a cross-sectional study for concurrent (correlation with the English version) and construct validity, and test-retest reliability in a sample of 102 apparently healthy adults. Results The Hausa IPAQ-SF has good concurrent validity with Spearman correlation coefficients (ρ) ranging from 0.78 for vigorous activity (Min Week-1) to 0.92 for total physical activity (Metabolic Equivalent of Task [MET]-Min Week-1), but poor construct validity, with cardiorespiratory fitness (ρ = 0.21, p = 0.01) and body mass index (ρ = 0.22, p = 0.04) significantly correlated with only moderate activity and sitting time (Min Week-1), respectively. Reliability was good for vigorous (ICC = 0.73, 95% C.I = 0.55-0.84) and total physical activity (ICC = 0.61, 95% C.I = 0.47-0.72), but fair for moderate activity (ICC = 0.33, 95% C.I = 0.12-0.51), and few meaningful differences were found in the gender and socioeconomic status specific analyses. Conclusions The Hausa IPAQ-SF has acceptable concurrent validity and test-retest reliability for vigorous-intensity activity, walking, sitting and total physical activity, but demonstrated only fair construct validity for moderate and sitting activities. The Hausa IPAQ-SF can be used for physical activity measurements in Nigeria, but further construct validity testing with objective measures such as an accelerometer is needed.
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            [Health related quality of life in adults in Germany: results of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1)].

             U Ellert,  L B Kurth (2013)
            The aim of this study is to describe health related quality of life (HRQL) of the German adult population and provide current representative normative data for the version 2 of the SF-36 (SF-36V2) in the German population. In the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1) the SF-36V2 was used to measure health-related quality of life. Men report in all areas better HRQOL compared to women, a lower social status is associated with lower HRQOL-values. Having one or more chronic diseases is associated with lower values in all dimensions of health-related quality of life. Compared to 10 years ago, the General health seems to be much better in women aged 40 to 49 years and older and in men aged 50 to 59 years and older. Version 2 of the SF-36 has proved to be a robust instrument of health-related quality of life that is able to plausible map differences regarding socio-demographic and health characteristics. An English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.
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              Use of the SF-8 to assess health-related quality of life for a chronically ill, low-income population participating in the Central Louisiana Medication Access Program (CMAP).

              The utility of the SF-8 for assessing health-related quality of life (HRQL) is demonstrated. Race and gender differences in physical component (PCS) and mental component (MCS) summary scores among participants in the CENLA Medication Access Program (CMAP), along with comparisons to the United States population are made. Age-adjusted multiple linear regression analyses were used to compare 1687 CMAP participants to the US population. Internal race and gender comparisons, adjusting for age and the number of self reported diagnoses, were also obtained. The paired t-test was used to assess 6-month change in PCS and MCS scores for a subset of 342 participants. CMAP participants have PCS and MCS scores that are significantly 10-12 points lower than the US population, indicating lower self-reported HRQL. Females have significantly higher PCS and significantly lower MCS than males. African-Americans have significantly higher MCS than Caucasians. Significant increases in both PCS and MCS were observed for the subset of participants after 6 months of intervention. The expected lower baseline PCS and MCS measures and the expected associations with age and number of diagnoses indicate that the SF-8 survey is an effective tool for measuring the HRQL of participants in this program. Preliminary results indicate significant increases in both PCS and MCS 6 months after intervention.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ]Physical Activity, Sport and Recreation Research Focus Area, Faculty of Health Sciences, North-West University, South Africa
                [2 ]School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
                [3 ]Redcliffe Hospital, Queensland, Australia
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Sarah Moss, hanlie.moss@ 123456nwu.ac.za
                Journal
                Health SA
                Health SA
                HSAG
                Health SA = SA Gesondheid
                AOSIS
                1025-9848
                2071-9736
                22 November 2018
                2018
                : 23
                HSAG-23-1092
                10.4102/hsag.v23i0.1092
                6917454
                © 2018. The Authors

                Licensee: AOSIS. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.

                Categories
                Original Research

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