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      Foster Care as a Form of Support to Dysfunctional Families – Theoretical Views and Social Work Research Perspectives

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      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          The authors explore the complexities of foster care and analyze it as a form of support to dysfunctional families within the framework of today’s social work research and practices. They take into account various socio-legal aspects of foster care and examine its socio-legal evolution. In the course of their analysis, the authors examine differences, as observed by social work researchers in implementation of foster care worldwide, and in selected countries. Finally, the authors identify research trends in the area of foster care support from social work perspectives and provide respective key examples of research studies.

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          Most cited references 8

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          The Background of Children who enter Local Authority Care

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            Surviving the care system: education and resilience.

             S. Jackson,  P Martin (1998)
            The Children Act 1989 requires local authorities in England and Wales to look after children whose parents are unable to do so and to promote their welfare. Despite a variety of initiatives over recent years by central government, local authorities, researchers, practitioners and trainers, the outcomes for the majority of young people who spend any length of time in care continue to be poor. The studies described in this paper sought to trace a group of more successful people who had grown up in care, using educational achievement as a marker. In an attempt to find out what were the qualities and circumstances that helped them to do better, 105 completed a postal questionnaire and a subgroup of 38 "high achievers" participated in a more intensive study. These were compared with a matched group of ex-care people who had not reached the threshold for inclusion in the study. The pre-care background and experiences of the successful group were found to be typical of children in the care system generally. A risk and resilience framework was used to identify the protective factors which enabled this small group to achieve a life trajectory very different from that of their siblings and peers. From their own accounts, success in education was a crucial factor. The implications for child care practice and decision-making are discussed.
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              Institutional care: associations between overactivity and lack of selectivity in social relationships

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                cswhi
                Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                2222386X
                20769741
                December 20 2018
                December 16 2018
                December 20 2018
                December 16 2018
                : 9
                : 4
                : 7-15
                Article
                10.22359/cswhi_9_4_01
                © 2018

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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