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      Nutrition physiological significance of selenium over redox route

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      Science Impact, Ltd.

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          Abstract

          Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans, and seafood is one of the major selenium source in Japan. Recent studies showed that the tissues of tuna, other predatory fish, and whales contain high levels of selenoneine. Selenoneine contains an imidazole ring with a unique selenoketone group and has an antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. The dietary intake of selenoneine through fish consumption is thought to be important for enhancing selenium redox functions in tissues and cells. In addition, selenoneine accelerated the excretion and demethylation of methylmercury through the formation of secretory extracellular lysosomal vesicles via the specific organic cation/carnitine transporter-1 (OCTN1). Dietary intake of selenoneine might decrease the formation of hydroxyl and other radicals and accelerate the excretion of peroxides and heavy metals, and thereby inhibit carcinogenesis, lifestyle chronic diseases, and aging.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Impact
          impact
          Science Impact, Ltd.
          2398-7073
          September 01 2017
          September 01 2017
          : 2017
          : 7
          : 66-68
          Article
          10.21820/23987073.2017.7.66
          © 2017

          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

          Earth & Environmental sciences, Medicine, Computer science, Agriculture, Engineering

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