Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework ( SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4 4 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

      Abstract

      The capture and removal of low-concentration carbon dioxide from air is appealing. Here, the authors report a metal-organic framework with a precisely tuned network of pores and optimal charge density, which is capable of carbon dioxide uptake at very low partial pressures relevant to direct air capture.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 10

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Carbon dioxide capture in metal-organic frameworks.

        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Dramatic tuning of carbon dioxide uptake via metal substitution in a coordination polymer with cylindrical pores.

        A series of four isostructural microporous coordination polymers (MCPs) differing in metal composition is demonstrated to exhibit exceptional uptake of CO2 at low pressures and ambient temperature. These conditions are particularly relevant for capture of flue gas from coal-fired power plants. A magnesium-based material is presented that is the highest surface area magnesium MCP yet reported and displays ultrahigh affinity based on heat of adsorption for CO2. This study demonstrates that physisorptive materials can achieve affinities and capacities competitive with amine sorbents while greatly reducing the energy cost associated with regeneration.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Porous materials with optimal adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics for CO2 separation.

          The energy costs associated with the separation and purification of industrial commodities, such as gases, fine chemicals and fresh water, currently represent around 15 per cent of global energy production, and the demand for such commodities is projected to triple by 2050 (ref. 1). The challenge of developing effective separation and purification technologies that have much smaller energy footprints is greater for carbon dioxide (CO2) than for other gases; in addition to its involvement in climate change, CO2 is an impurity in natural gas, biogas (natural gas produced from biomass), syngas (CO/H2, the main source of hydrogen in refineries) and many other gas streams. In the context of porous crystalline materials that can exploit both equilibrium and kinetic selectivity, size selectivity and targeted molecular recognition are attractive characteristics for CO2 separation and capture, as exemplified by zeolites 5A and 13X (ref. 2), as well as metal-organic materials (MOMs). Here we report that a crystal engineering or reticular chemistry strategy that controls pore functionality and size in a series of MOMs with coordinately saturated metal centres and periodically arrayed hexafluorosilicate (SiF(2-)(6)) anions enables a 'sweet spot' of kinetics and thermodynamics that offers high volumetric uptake at low CO2 partial pressure (less than 0.15 bar). Most importantly, such MOMs offer an unprecedented CO2 sorption selectivity over N2, H2 and CH4, even in the presence of moisture. These MOMs are therefore relevant to CO2 separation in the context of post-combustion (flue gas, CO2/N2), pre-combustion (shifted synthesis gas stream, CO2/H2) and natural gas upgrading (natural gas clean-up, CO2/CH4).
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Functional Materials Design, Discovery and development (FMD3), Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials (AMPM); Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) , Thuwal 23955-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
            [2 ]These authors contributed equally to this work
            Author notes
            Journal
            Nat Commun
            Nat Commun
            Nature Communications
            Nature Pub. Group
            2041-1723
            25 June 2014
            : 5
            24964404
            4083436
            ncomms5228
            10.1038/ncomms5228
            Copyright © 2014, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

            Categories
            Article

            Uncategorized

            Comments

            Comment on this article