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      Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults: A 2012 Update

      brief-report

      , PhD , , MPH, , MD, MPH

      Preventing Chronic Disease

      Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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          Abstract

          The objective of this research was to update earlier estimates of prevalence rates of single chronic conditions and multiple ( >2) chronic conditions (MCC) among the noninstitutionalized, civilian US adult population. Data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to generate estimates of MCC for US adults and by select demographic characteristics. Approximately half (117 million) of US adults have at least one of the 10 chronic conditions examined (ie, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, hepatitis, weak or failing kidneys, current asthma, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Furthermore, 1 in 4 adults has MCC.

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          Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010.

          This report presents health statistics from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized adult population, classified by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage, marital status, and place and region of residence. Estimates are presented for selected chronic conditions and mental health characteristics, functional limitations, health status, health behaviors, health care access and utilization, and human immunodeficiency virus testing. Percentages and percent distributions are presented in both age-adjusted and unadjusted versions. NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2010, data were collected on 27,157 adults in the Sample Adult questionnaire. The conditional response rate was 77.3%, and the final response rate was 60.8%. The health information for adults in this report was obtained from one randomly selected adult per family. In very rare instances where the sample adult was not able to respond for himself or herself, a proxy was used. In 2010, 61% of adults aged 18 years and over had excellent or very good health. Twelve percent of adults had been told by a doctor or health professional that they had heart disease, 25% had been told on two or more visits that they had hypertension, 9% had been told they had diabetes, and 22% had been told they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. Twenty-one percent of adults were current smokers, and 21% were former smokers. Based on estimates of body mass index, 35% of adults were overweight and 27% were obese.
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            Co-Occurrence of Leading Lifestyle-Related Chronic Conditions Among Adults in the United States, 2002-2009

            Introduction Public health and clinical strategies for meeting the emerging challenges of multiple chronic conditions must address the high prevalence of lifestyle-related causes. Our objective was to assess prevalence and trends in the chronic conditions that are leading causes of disease and death among adults in the United States that are amenable to preventive lifestyle interventions. Methods We used self-reported data from 196,240 adults aged 25 years or older who participated in the National Health Interview Surveys from 2002 to 2009. We included data on cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, angina pectoris, heart attack, and stroke), cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (emphysema and chronic bronchitis), diabetes, and arthritis. Results In 2002, an unadjusted 63.6% of participants did not have any of the 5 chronic conditions we assessed; 23.9% had 1, 9.0% had 2, 2.9% had 3, and 0.7% had 4 or 5. By 2009, the distribution of co-occurrence of the 5 chronic conditions had shifted subtly but significantly. From 2002 to 2009, the age-adjusted percentage with 2 or more chronic conditions increased from 12.7% to 14.7% (P < .001), and the number of adults with 2 or more conditions increased from approximately 23.4 million to 30.9 million. Conclusion The prevalence of having 1 or more or 2 or more of the leading lifestyle-related chronic conditions increased steadily from 2002 to 2009. If these increases continue, particularly among younger adults, managing patients with multiple chronic conditions in the aging population will continue to challenge public health and clinical practice.
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              Oral health status and access to oral health care for U.S. adults aged 18-64: National Health Interview Survey, 2008.

              This report presents statistics from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on selected measures of oral health status and oral health care access for adults aged 18-64. Estimates are presented by sex, age, race and ethnicity, nativity, education, poverty status, health and dental insurance status, region, place of residence, dentition status, current smoking status, current drinking status, and diabetes status. NHIS is a multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics, and is representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Data are collected for all family members during face-to-face interviews with adults present at the time of interview. Additional health information is obtained from one randomly selected adult. If the selected adult is physically or mentally incapable of responding for himself or herself, a proxy respondent is used. Among adults aged 18-64, about three-quarters had very good or good oral health, 17% had fair oral health, and 7% had poor oral health. Adults with Medicaid were almost five times as likely as adults with private health insurance to have poor oral health. Adults with Medicaid (21%) were almost twice as likely as adults overall (12%) to not have had a dental visit in more than 5 years. Among adults aged 18-64, the main reason to forgo a dental visit for an oral health problem in the past 6 months was cost; 42% could not afford treatment or did not have insurance. Fear was the reason that 1 out of 10 adults did not visit the dentist for an oral health problem.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Prev Chronic Dis
                Prev Chronic Dis
                PCD
                Preventing Chronic Disease
                Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                1545-1151
                2014
                17 April 2014
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1]Author Affiliations: Jeannine S. Schiller, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland. Richard A. Goodman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Emory University Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, Atlanta, Georgia.
                Author notes
                Corresponding Author: Brian W. Ward, National Center for Health Statistics, 3311 Toledo Rd, Rm 2330, Hyattsville, MD 20782. Telephone: 301-458-4568. E-mail: bwward@ 123456cdc.gov .
                Article
                13_0389
                10.5888/pcd11.130389
                3992293
                24742395
                a97ae3fd-1d40-4c95-bf6b-327e3aeee387
                Categories
                Brief
                Peer Reviewed

                Health & Social care

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