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      The multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis: A review of its biology, uses in biological control, and non-target impacts

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          Abstract

          Throughout the last century, the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) has been studied quite extensively, with topics ranging from genetics and evolution to population dynamics and applied biological control being covered. Much of the early work on H. axyridis was conducted in the native Asian range. From the 1980's to the present, numerous European and North American studies have added to the body of literature on H. axyridis. H. axyridis has recently gained attention in North America both as a biological control agent and as a pest. This literature review was compiled for two reasons. First, to assist other researchers as a reference, summarizing most of the voluminous body of literature on H. axyridis pertaining to its biology, life history, uses in biological control, and potential non-target impacts. Secondly, to be a case study on the impacts of an exotic generalist predator.

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          Environmental Impacts of Classical Biological Control

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            A microfluorometric method for quantifying RNA and DNA in terrestrial insects

            Evidence is accumulating for a mechanistic linkage between body phosphorus content and growth and reproduction of individual organisms, due in part to variation in allocation of resources to ribosomal RNA. Testing this connection requires reliable methods of quantifying the nucleic acid content of individual organisms. Although methods for quantifying nucleic acids are available for a wide array of organisms, adaptation of such methods for study of insects has been neglected. Sensitive stains and high throughput fluorometric measurements are now available that substantially improve past methodologies. Here we present methods for the extraction and quantification of insect RNA and DNA based on the use of N-lauroylsarcosine and sonication for extraction, the nucleases RNase and DNase, and the use of microplate fluorescent assays to quantify nucleic acids as percent of body weight in insects. We illustrate the method using Drosophila and curculionid weevils.
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              Invasion of the Florida Citrus Ecosystem byHarmonia axyridis(Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Asymmetric Competition with a Native Species,Cycloneda sanguinea

               J-P Michaud (2002)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Insect Sci
                Journal of Insect Science
                University of Arizona Library
                1536-2442
                2003
                13 October 2003
                : 3
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Entomology, 219 Hodson Hall, 1980 Folwell Avenue, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, 55108, USA koch0125@ 123456umn.edu
                Article
                524671
                15841248
                Copyright © 2003. Open access; copyright is maintained by the authors.
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