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      Factores asociados al uso regular de fuentes de información en estudiantes de medicina de cuatro ciudades del Perú Translated title: Factors associated with the regular use of sources of information by medical students from four cities of Peru

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          Abstract

          Objetivos. Determinar los factores asociados al uso regular de fuentes de información en estudiantes de Medicina de cuatro ciudades de Perú. Materiales y métodos. Estudio transversal analítico, se encuestó a estudiantes de Medicina de cuatro ciudades del Perú, recopilando información del uso de 14 fuentes de información y otras variables educativas e informáticas. Se definió uso frecuente de la fuente de información si accedía a ella mínimo una vez a la semana. Se obtuvieron los valores p mediante modelos lineales generalizados ajustando por la sede de cada encuestado. Resultados. Se encuestaron 2300 estudiantes con una mediana de edad de 21 años, el 53% fueron mujeres. El recibir una capacitación para el uso de las fuentes incrementó el uso en doce de las bases consultadas, no en SciELO (p=0,053) ni en la biblioteca universitaria (p=0,509). Cuando se añadió el ajuste por poseer una laptop/netbook se mantuvieron dichas asociaciones. Al ajustar también por poseer un smartphone se perdió la asociación con la base BVS Perú (p=0,067), lo mismo ocurrió al hacer el último ajuste, si había realizado alguna actividad de investigación. Conclusiones. El uso frecuente de las fuentes de la información está asociado con haber recibido capacitación, realizar investigación y el uso de las tecnologías de la información y comunicación. Esto debe ser tomado en cuenta en programas de capacitación y mejora continua en el pre y posgrado.

          Translated abstract

          Objetives. To determine the factors associated with regular use of sources of information by medical students in four cities in Peru. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional study, medical students were surveyed in four cities of Peru, gathering information on the use of 14 sources of information and other educational and computer variables. Frequent use of the information source was defined if the respondent reported that they access an information source at least once a week. P values were obtained by generalized linear models adjusted for each respondent site. Results. 2,300 students were surveyed. The median age was 21 years and 53% were women. Having received training in the use of sources increased the use in twelve of the consulted bases, not in SciELO (p=0.053) or in the university library (p=0.509).When adjusting for owning a laptop/netbook, these associations remained. After also adjusting for owning a smartphone the association was lost with the BVS Peru database (p=0.067). The association was also lost after making the final adjustment, if the respondent had carried out any research activities. Conclusions. The frequent use of sources of information is associated with having received training, conducting research and use of information technologies and communication. This should be taken into account in training programs and continuous improvement in undergraduate education.

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          Most cited references 47

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          The Smartphone in Medicine: A Review of Current and Potential Use Among Physicians and Students

          Background Advancements in technology have always had major impacts in medicine. The smartphone is one of the most ubiquitous and dynamic trends in communication, in which one’s mobile phone can also be used for communicating via email, performing Internet searches, and using specific applications. The smartphone is one of the fastest growing sectors in the technology industry, and its impact in medicine has already been significant. Objective To provide a comprehensive and up-to-date summary of the role of the smartphone in medicine by highlighting the ways in which it can enhance continuing medical education, patient care, and communication. We also examine the evidence base for this technology. Methods We conducted a review of all published uses of the smartphone that could be applicable to the field of medicine and medical education with the exclusion of only surgical-related uses. Results In the 60 studies that were identified, we found many uses for the smartphone in medicine; however, we also found that very few high-quality studies exist to help us understand how best to use this technology. Conclusions While the smartphone’s role in medicine and education appears promising and exciting, more high-quality studies are needed to better understand the role it will have in this field. We recommend popular smartphone applications for physicians that are lacking in evidence and discuss future studies to support their use.
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            Mobile devices in medicine: a survey of how medical students, residents, and faculty use smartphones and other mobile devices to find information.

            The research investigated the extent to which students, residents, and faculty members in Canadian medical faculties use mobile devices, such as smartphones (e.g., iPhone, Android, Blackberry) and tablet computers (e.g., iPad), to answer clinical questions and find medical information. The results of this study will inform how health libraries can effectively support mobile technology and collections.
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              Evidence of Effectiveness of Health Care Professionals Using Handheld Computers: A Scoping Review of Systematic Reviews

              Background Handheld computers and mobile devices provide instant access to vast amounts and types of useful information for health care professionals. Their reduced size and increased processing speed has led to rapid adoption in health care. Thus, it is important to identify whether handheld computers are actually effective in clinical practice. Objective A scoping review of systematic reviews was designed to provide a quick overview of the documented evidence of effectiveness for health care professionals using handheld computers in their clinical work. Methods A detailed search, sensitive for systematic reviews was applied for Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Global Health, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. All outcomes that demonstrated effectiveness in clinical practice were included. Classroom learning and patient use of handheld computers were excluded. Quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. A previously published conceptual framework was used as the basis for dual data extraction. Reported outcomes were summarized according to the primary function of the handheld computer. Results Five systematic reviews met the inclusion and quality criteria. Together, they reviewed 138 unique primary studies. Most reviewed descriptive intervention studies, where physicians, pharmacists, or medical students used personal digital assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across four distinct functions of handheld computers: patient documentation, patient care, information seeking, and professional work patterns. Within each of these functions, a range of positive outcomes were reported using both objective and self-report measures. The use of handheld computers improved patient documentation through more complete recording, fewer documentation errors, and increased efficiency. Handheld computers provided easy access to clinical decision support systems and patient management systems, which improved decision making for patient care. Handheld computers saved time and gave earlier access to new information. There were also reports that handheld computers enhanced work patterns and efficiency. Conclusions This scoping review summarizes the secondary evidence for effectiveness of handheld computers and mhealth. It provides a snapshot of effective use by health care professionals across four key functions. We identified evidence to suggest that handheld computers provide easy and timely access to information and enable accurate and complete documentation. Further, they can give health care professionals instant access to evidence-based decision support and patient management systems to improve clinical decision making. Finally, there is evidence that handheld computers allow health professionals to be more efficient in their work practices. It is anticipated that this evidence will guide clinicians and managers in implementing handheld computers in clinical practice and in designing future research.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                rpmesp
                Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental y Salud Pública
                Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica
                Instituto Nacional de Salud (Lima )
                1726-4634
                April 2015
                : 32
                : 2
                : 230-236
                S1726-46342015000200003

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Product
                Product Information: SciELO Peru
                Categories
                Health Policy & Services

                Public health

                Bases de datos de citas, Bibliography, Citation databases, Internet, Bibliografía

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