Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Online characterization of planetary surfaces: PlanetServer, an open-source analysis and visualization tool

Preprint

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      In this paper we present the new PlanetServer, a set of tools comprising a web Geographic Information System (GIS) and a recently developed Python API capable of analyzing a wide variety of hyperspectral data from different planetary bodies. The research case studies are focusing on 1) the characterization of different hydrosilicates such as chlorites, prehnites and kaolinites in the Nili Fossae area on Mars, and 2) the characterization of ice (CO 2 and H 2 O ice) in two different areas of Mars where ice was reported in a nearly pure state. Results show positive outcome in hyperspectral analysis and visualization compared to previous literature, therefore we suggest using PlanetServer for such investigations.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 25

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Phyllosilicates on Mars and implications for early martian climate.

      The recent identification of large deposits of sulphates by remote sensing and in situ observations has been considered evidence of the past presence of liquid water on Mars. Here we report the unambiguous detection of diverse phyllosilicates, a family of aqueous alteration products, on the basis of observations by the OMEGA imaging spectrometer on board the Mars Express spacecraft. These minerals are mainly associated with Noachian outcrops, which is consistent with an early active hydrological system, sustaining the long-term contact of igneous minerals with liquid water. We infer that the two main families of hydrated alteration products detected-phyllosilicates and sulphates--result from different formation processes. These occurred during two distinct climatic episodes: an early Noachian Mars, resulting in the formation of hydrated silicates, followed by a more acidic environment, in which sulphates formed.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Mars surface diversity as revealed by the OMEGA/Mars Express observations.

        The Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces, et l'Activité (OMEGA) investigation, on board the European Space Agency Mars Express mission, is mapping the surface composition of Mars at a 0.3- to 5-kilometer resolution by means of visible-near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imagery. The data acquired during the first 9 months of the mission already reveal a diverse and complex surface mineralogy, offering key insights into the evolution of Mars. OMEGA has identified and mapped mafic iron-bearing silicates of both the northern and southern crust, localized concentrations of hydrated phyllosilicates and sulfates but no carbonates, and ices and frosts with a water-ice composition of the north polar perennial cap, as for the south cap, covered by a thin carbon dioxide-ice veneer.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Hydrated silicate minerals on Mars observed by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM instrument.

          Phyllosilicates, a class of hydrous mineral first definitively identified on Mars by the OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, L'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activitié) instrument, preserve a record of the interaction of water with rocks on Mars. Global mapping showed that phyllosilicates are widespread but are apparently restricted to ancient terrains and a relatively narrow range of mineralogy (Fe/Mg and Al smectite clays). This was interpreted to indicate that phyllosilicate formation occurred during the Noachian (the earliest geological era of Mars), and that the conditions necessary for phyllosilicate formation (moderate to high pH and high water activity) were specific to surface environments during the earliest era of Mars's history. Here we report results from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of phyllosilicate-rich regions. We expand the diversity of phyllosilicate mineralogy with the identification of kaolinite, chlorite and illite or muscovite, and a new class of hydrated silicate (hydrated silica). We observe diverse Fe/Mg-OH phyllosilicates and find that smectites such as nontronite and saponite are the most common, but chlorites are also present in some locations. Stratigraphic relationships in the Nili Fossae region show olivine-rich materials overlying phyllosilicate-bearing units, indicating the cessation of aqueous alteration before emplacement of the olivine-bearing unit. Hundreds of detections of Fe/Mg phyllosilicate in rims, ejecta and central peaks of craters in the southern highland Noachian cratered terrain indicate excavation of altered crust from depth. We also find phyllosilicate in sedimentary deposits clearly laid by water. These results point to a rich diversity of Noachian environments conducive to habitability.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            2017-01-06
            1701.01726

            http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

            Custom metadata
            astro-ph.EP cs.OH

            Planetary astrophysics, General computer science

            Comments

            Comment on this article